SF New Mexican – New app explores New Mexico’s Native American culture

Here. An excerpt:

Curious about New Mexico’s tribes? Now there’s an app to help you learn more about the state’s diverse American Indian culture.

The free iPad application, created by the New Mexico State University, offers interesting facts in a fun format about the state’s 22 pueblos, tribes and nations. The goal is to educate residents about the culture, said Justin McHorse, a director with the university’s American Indian program. He said the idea came from a board game created three years ago that has been used as an educational tool in the classrooms.

And here is an opinion piece on the app, with an excerpt.

Modern kids like using technology to learn — whether driving with family or sitting in the classroom. Providing knowledge about the state’s original inhabitants through the latest technology makes sense, and perhaps use of the app will spread across the country.

One of the best ways to combat ignorance about the continent’s first inhabitants is by the spread of knowledge. Eventually, with knowledge, residents in states with fewer Native communities can begin to understand that Indians are living cultures, not just a relic of history.

MINN Post – Minnesota report focuses on programs that work for Indian students

Here. An excerpt.

At 45.5 percent, Minnesota has the lowest on-time high-school graduation rate for its Native American students of any state in the country. Though acknowledging that hard truth, a new report by the Minnesota Campaign for Achievement Now (MinnCAN) reflects hope.

The report, “Native American Student Achievement in Minnesota,” not only focuses on some of the programs that are working for Indian students, but it is also a clear statement of Indian people’s commitment to help their children.

Said Gerard Sorderlet Sr., chairman of the Cloquet Local Indian Education Committee and an enrolled member of the Fond du Lac Tribe: “On the reservation we have a lot of addiction and a lot of poverty, and the only thing I know that can change that cycle is education.’’

The Report can be seen here.

Language summit draws tribes from across Nation

Here, from Indianz and Native Sun News.  A quote:

 In the foothills of the sacred Black Hills, the Lakota/Dakota/Nakota language was not only examined and researched in an academic manner, but it was celebrated by the participants of the 6th Annual Tusweca Tiyospaye Language Summit.

Held at the Ramkota Hotel, the language summit drew people from across Indian Country to look at the history, the practical application and the preservation efforts of the language that binds the tribes of the Oceti Sakowin together.

The keynote speaker for the opening ceremonies was recording artist Keith Secola, Anishinabe who spoke about the need to not only preserve the language but to flourish the language through education and application beginning in childhood.

NYT – Canadian Universities Strive to Include Indigenous Cultures

Here. An excerpt:

“We are looking at replacing the legacy of the residential schools with a vibrant new learning culture in every First Nation, grounded in our proud heritage, identity and language,” Mr. Atleo, who is also chancellor of Vancouver Island University in Nanaimo, British Columbia, later declared, in a 2011 speech.

“To get there, we need to work with every university and college, with school boards, corporations and foundations and indeed all people in Canada,” he said.

The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, along with several of its member schools, has heeded that call, recognizing that education statistics tell a sorry tale. The 2006 Canadian census indicates that only 13 percent of Aboriginal adults — First Nations, Inuit and Métis — aged 25 to 64 had university degrees, compared with 33 percent of other Canadians.