The Salish Kootenai College Center for Tribal Research and Education in Ecosystem Sciences (TREES) just received funding through the BIA Forestry Tribal Youth Initiative to fund a national network of 20 high school interns this summer. Here is how it works:

Tribes may apply for one or two interns that are either current high school students or are under the age of 24 and are attending college as non-forestry majors (but might be interested in switching)

For each intern, the tribal forestry program will receive a direct payment of $5,000 for intern salary and an additional $1,000 for expenses and equipment.  In addition, if the intern decides to enroll in any college forestry program in the next two years, SKC TREES will award him/her a one-time $2,000 scholarship

Applications must come from tribal forestry or BIA partners but are very simple: please provide name, age and tribal affiliation of proposed intern and a brief description of what the intern will be doing. Preference will be given to applicants that focus on introducing the intern to key activities in forest management. You can email this information directly to me at this email address

If you have any questions, please email at adrian_leighton@skc.edu or call Adrian Leighton, PhD Chair, Natural Resources Department at the  Salish Kootenai College on her cell phone (406-885-2787). A total of 20 interns will be supported during this summer, and applications can begin immediately, and will be considered until all positions are filled

Please pass this post on to others that may be interested. The Salish Kootenai College is very excited to “host” this opportunity and hope that it helps build the career ladder in forestry for BIA and Tribes.

Eagle Books

New Eagle Books Novels, Toolkit, for Schools

Eagle Books are beautifully written and illustrated stories that use traditional ways and the wisdom of a wise eagle to inspire young readers to find joy in physical activity, eat healthy foods, and learn about type 2 diabetes prevention.

Added recently:  Three adventure novels for students in grades 5-9 have been added to the original four stories for pre-K to grade 4 students. So have dozens of free Eagle Books Toolkit downloads including posters, games, crafts, flyers, activity and event planning guides, stationery, and other resources to help solidify the heath messages of the series.

Use the Eagle Books to teach about health, nutrition, language arts, science, physical education, and Native culture. Use them in classrooms, school assemblies, health fairs, parent nights, and field days. The Eagle Books are free to families and to programs that serve American Indian and Alaska Native children and youth.

Order Free Eagle Books – Families  or 1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)

Order Free Eagle Books – Classrooms

Download items from the Eagle Books Toolkit

The Eagle Books are produced by the Native Diabetes Wellness Program at the Centers for Disease and Prevention in cooperation with the Tribal Leaders Diabetes Committee and the Indian Health Service.  The series includes four original stories, three youth novels, animations, podcasts, graphic novels, and support materials for teachers and communities. The Eagle Books are also part of the Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools curriculum.

History in the making for Indian Country, again!

First, Diane Humetewa becomes the first Native American woman to become a U.S. District Court Judge and now Keith Harper (Cherokee Nation) is to become the new representative to the United Nations Human Rights Council.

An excerpt:

The U.S. Senate has a rare opportunity today to make history. President Obama’s nominee for ambassador to the United Nations Human Rights Council, Keith Harper, is scheduled for a confirmation vote in the Senate.

This vote is historic because Harper is a citizen of the Cherokee Nation and as such would be the first Native American to serve this nation as an ambassador.

Harper is a longtime advocate for tribal communities throughout the nation and has been a leader in some of the most important legal matters regarding Native Americans over his two-decade-long career.

You can read more here!

  1. S. 1948, A bill to promote the academic achievement of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian children with the establishment of a Native American language grant program;
  2. S. 1998, A bill to amend the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act to reserve funds for American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, and Tribal College or University adult education and literacy;
  3. S. 2299, A bill to amend the Native American Programs Act of 1974 to reauthorize a provision to ensure the survival and continuing vitality of Native American languages.
  • Date: 6/18/14 @ 2:30PM
  • Location: 628 Dirksen Senate Office Building
  • Type: Legislative Hearing

View more on the US Senate Committee on Indian Affairs!

Here is the article from Native News Online. An excerpt:

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Jon Tester (D – Montana), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, on Wednesday expressed frustration over the lack of strategic planning and budgeting by the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE).

His comments came on the third hearing on Indian education the Committee on Indian Affairs has held since he took over the chairmanship earlier this year.

 “NEARLY TWO-THIRDS OF BIE SCHOOLS ARE IN FAIR TO POOR CONDITION AND YET THERE HAS BEEN NO STRATEGIC PLANNING SINCE 2004,” COMMENTED SENATOR TESTER IN HIS OPENING REMARKS.  “IF THE BIE DOESN’T PLAN FOR THE FUTURE WE CAN NEVER PULL INDIAN COUNTRY OUT OF POVERTY.  EDUCATION IS THE KEY TO UNLOCKING A PROMISING FUTURE FOR THE TRIBES OF THIS NATION.” SENATOR TESTER CONTINUED.