NCAI is committed to investing in the next generation of leaders to protect and advance tribal sovereignty for generations to come. Young Native leaders are invited to apply for either our internship or the Wilma Mankiller Fellowship. The application can be downloaded for initial review here and completed online at this link: http://tinyurl.com/NCAIapp.

Deadlines for 2015 applications are as follows:

  • Wilma Mankiller Fellowship – Applications due March 15 with decisions made no later than April 15.
  • Summer 2015 Internship – Applications will be accepted until March 31 with decisions made no later than April 30.
  • Fall 2015 Internship – Applications will be accepted until June 22 with decisions made no later than July 20.

More details regarding fellowships and internships at NCAI can be found on our website.

  NCAI Contact Information: Jamie Gomez, Director of External Affairs – jgomez@ncai.org


 NCAI Native Graduate Health Fellowship – Applications Due March 23, 2015

 The NCAI Native Graduate Health Fellowship aims to address the stark disparities in Native health by building a pipeline of Native health professionals who are prepared to lead in formulating and promoting health policies and practices that address the unique needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. While the current challenges of Native health are great, some of the most promising developments are from Native nations who are exercising considerable control over health care delivery and workforce development. Building the capacity of individuals and communities is critical to empowering tribes to assert this right to self-governance and self-determination in the public health domain. By supporting graduate students in various health-related fields, NCAI seeks to increase the number of Native health leaders and equip them with the tools necessary to achieve our vision of strong, healthy Native communities.

Download Application 
Download Reference & Evaluation Form

NCAI Contact Information: Laura Bird, Legislative Associate – lbird@ncai.org

NIEA is hiring a new Federal Policy Associate!

The NIEA Federal Policy Associate position is responsible for building support for the advancement of Native education policy through various vehicles – from working with key stakeholder groups to coalition partners and policy makers in in the federal government. This is an exciting opportunity to work closely with Native communities, Native organizations, and education leaders to provide support for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students and the education policy that affects them.

To view the full posting, click here.

To view the BIA’s 2016 budget in detail, click here.  An excerpt:

Tribal Education Departments (TEDs) [$2,000,000]:

Tribal Education Departments (TEDs) provide a multitude of services to promoting tribal educational priorities. The goal of these funds is to build the capacity of TEDs so they can coordinate educational services within reservations to better serve all tribal members. These funds will create opportunities to strengthen TED engagement with the multitude of other school systems operating within tribal reservations. These funds would be directed to strengthen the management and oversight of the education programs including BIE funded schools, school operations, adult education, scholarships, and other programs funded by the tribe and other federal agencies, under their jurisdiction. A first step for many tribes is the adoption and updating of tribal education codes to align a tribal education vision with policy. Two million dollars are requested to prioritize tribes with more than three BIE-funded schools on their reservation to establish a tribally managed school system.

The Young Native Writers Essay Contest is a writing contest for Native American high school students and is designed to encourage young Native Americans to write about their experiences as a member of a Native American community and the culture that inspires them.

The voices that emerge from this program honor the legacy of every Native American who has ever lived. Add your words to the thousands submitted through this project – all writers receive a Certificate of Honor for their submission.

The Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation’s goal of promoting education and creating new opportunities for youth has inspired this essay contest. Partnering with Holland & Knight in this endeavor are the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Indian Education Association.

Click here for more information.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Thursday, February 12 at 11:15 a.m., the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education will hold a hearing to explore the use of new technology in the classroom and examine the need to modernize the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). The hearing, entitled “How Emerging Technology Affects Student Privacy,” will take place in room 2175 of the Rayburn House Office Building.
Advancements in classroom technology have become an important tool, enabling educators and researchers to develop new solutions to improve student learning. However, with the benefit of more technology comes the risk of compromising student privacy. The law intended to ensure parents’ rights and safeguard student records, FERPA, has not been significantly updated in 40 years. As a result, parents and students have become vulnerable to the inappropriate use of student data, often without their knowledge or consent.
Thursday’s hearing will provide members an opportunity to learn more about the role new technology is playing in classrooms and school accountability, its impact on student privacy, and the need to advance reforms that will strengthen student privacy protections.
To learn more about the hearing, click here.

WITNESS LIST

Ms. Shannon Sevier
Vice President for Advocacy
National Parent Teacher Association
San Antonio, TX

Ms. Allyson Knox
Director of Education Policy and Programs
Microsoft
Washington, D.C.

Dr. Sheryl R. Abshire
Chief Technology Officer
Calcasieu Parish Public Schools
Lake Charles, LA

Mr. Joel R. Reidenberg
Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Chair and Professor of Law
Founding Academic Director
Center on Law and Information Policy
Fordham Law School
New York, NY

***MEDIA ADVISORY***
Committee to Mark Up the Student Success Act
 H.R. 5 will replace No Child Left Behind and improve K-12 education

WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Wednesday, February 11 at 10:00 a.m., the House Committee  on Education and the Workforce, chaired by Rep. John Kline (R-MN), will mark up the Student Success Act (H.R. 5). The markup will take place in room 2175 of the Rayburn House Office Building.
There is broad, bipartisan agreement the current elementary and secondary education law, known as No Child Left Behind, is no longer meeting the needs of all students. One of five students do not receive a high school diploma and, of those who do, too few have the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in post-secondary education and compete in the workforce.
To replace No Child Left Behind and improve education, Chairman Kline and Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Chairman Todd Rokita (R-IN) introduced the Student Success Act. The legislation will reduce the federal footprint and restore local control, while empowering parents and education leaders to hold schools accountable for effectively teaching students.

H.R. 5 – STUDENT SUCCESS ACT:

•    Replaces the current national accountability scheme based on high stakes tests with state-led accountability systems, returning responsibility for measuring student and school performance to states and school districts.

•    Ensures parents continue to have the information they need to hold local schools accountable.

•    Consolidates more than 65 ineffective, duplicative, and unnecessary programs into a Local Academic Flexible Grant, helping schools better support students.

•    Protects state and local autonomy over decisions in the classroom by preventing the Secretary of Education from coercing states into adopting Common Core or any other common standards or assessments, as well as reining in the secretary’s regulatory authority.

•    Empowers parents with more school choice options by continuing support for magnet schools and expanding charter school opportunities, as well as allowing Title I funds to follow low-income children to the traditional public or charter school of the parent’s choice.

•    Strengthens existing efforts to improve student performance among targeted student populations, including English learners and homeless children.

To learn more about the Student Success Act, click here.
To learn more about the markup, visit http://www.edworkforce.house.gov/markups.