Job Announcement: TEDNA NYCP College and Career Readiness for Indian Students Project Director

The Tribal Education Department National Assembly (TEDNA) Native Youth Community Partners (NYCP) Project will develop, test, and demonstrate the effectiveness of College and Career Readiness services and supports to improve the educational opportunities and achievement of Indian students in middle and junior high school. The TEDNA NYCP Project is expected to achieve the goal that all participating Grade 6-9 Indian students will improve College and Career Readiness as defined by a successful transition into high school with a GPA of 2.0+ and a plan that addresses and supports College and Career Readiness that is locally informed. (Full abstract available upon request).

The success of the TEDNA NYCP Project will depend heavily on key personal attributes of the NYCP Project Director. Candidates for this position must bring:

  • Talent, intelligence, compassion, energy, enthusiasm and patience sufficient to bring all project participants to understand and personally invest in project success.
  • Sufficient understanding of tribal sovereignty, Native culture and Native experience to win and maintain acceptance and participation by the individuals and tribes that they will be serving.
  • Sufficient understanding of current and emerging learning, education and administrative practices (and their application in public, BIE and tribal schools) to build and maintain effective bridges within each community of students, parents, tribe, and school.
  • Sufficient understanding of the grant award criteria, TEDNA’s application and the roles and capacities of our OIE funder, our project evaluator and our partner service providers to build and maintain effective bridges within this community and each tribal community of students, parents, leaders and their partnering school.
  • A commitment to personal growth and development that will enable them to serve the NYCP Project’s highest potential as a demonstration project that informs and empowers all Native communities.

These attributes are also key to TEDNA’s success in recruiting and building the resources essential to fulfillment of our mission.

For more information, click here.

US. Department of Education Awards More Than $325,000 to Help School District on Pine Ridge Reservation Recover From Multiple Student Suicides

An excerpt:

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Safe and Healthy Students awarded Little Wound School on the Pine Ridge Reservation in southwestern South Dakota a Project School Emergency Response to Violence (SERV) grant totaling more than $325,000. The grant will be used to assist the Little Wound School with ongoing recovery efforts following 12 suicide deaths on the Pine Ridge reservation, including the deaths of current and former Little Wound School students, and relatives and friends of the students. In addition, there have been more than 100 suicide attempts on the reservation during the 2014-15 school year. This is the third Project SERV grant awarded to a school district on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The first grant was awarded in June 2010, and in June 2015, the Department awarded a grant to Pine Ridge School following a significant increase in student suicides. 

“These incidents are troubling, and my heart goes out to the students, families and community of Pine Ridge,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “There are so many people involved in the work to help children, families and the community heal after these tragedies, and this grant will help this community receive the services it needs to move forward in restoring the learning environment.”

There are two types of Project SERV awards—Immediate Services and Extended Services. Immediate Services grants provide emergency, short-term assistance to affected school districts or colleges and universities. Extended Services grants assist school districts and colleges and universities in carrying out the long-term recovery efforts that may be needed following a significant, traumatic event. To date, the Office of Safe and Healthy Students has awarded more than $42.1 million to 128 grantees, including Little Wound School, since the grants program began in 2001.

To view a list of Project SERV grantees and award amounts, or to learn more about the program, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/dvppserv/index.html.

To read the entire press release, click here.

After Decades of Hand-Wringing, U. of North Dakota Has a New Nickname

The University of North Dakota, at long last, has a new nickname, the Grand Forks Herald reports.

“Fighting Hawks” will replace “Fighting Sioux” as the university’s new moniker, ending a decades-long struggle over whether to discontinue the longtime Sioux mascot, which some students, faculty members, and alumni assailed as racist. Among the forces opposing the nickname’s removal were several lawsuits and, most recently, a former mayor’s effort to trademark the possible replacements.

The new nickname prevailed in a runoff vote after two names — “Fighting Hawks” and “Roughriders” — emerged via popular vote from a field of five.

Via The Denver Post: Guest Commentary: Why use “r–skin” word at all?

An excerpt:

By Kristen Carpenter and Carla Fredericks

The Denver Post recently weighed in on the controversy surrounding the National Football League’s team in Washington, D.C. The Post wrote, “Although the Redskins name ought to be retired, it shouldn’t occur at the expense of the First Amendment.”

We believe the case was decided properly, in our view, as a matter of federal trademark law and does not impact free speech.

The federal court in Blackhorse vs. Pro-Football, Inc., canceled six trademarks registered to the Pro-Football corporation. The federal Lanham Act prohibits registration of marks that “may disparage … persons living or dead.”

The court held the team’s marks, including the word “r–skin” and related images, refer in a vulgar and offensive way to American Indians, thereby violating the act.

To read the entire article, click here.