Via the Billings Gazette: Proposal would require tribal education for Wyoming teachers

RIVERTON — A proposal from a Wyoming lawmaker would require the state’s teachers and administrators to receive three hours of training on tribal studies.

Republican Rep. Jim Allen of Lander said he might sponsor a bill with such requirements when the legislative session begins Feb. 8. He said he’s gathering community input on the draft before moving forward.

The bill is a response to efforts by schools on the Wind River Indian Reservation to encourage statewide adoption of an American Indian education component in public schools.

Allen says he volunteered to help because the issue is based in his legislative district.

Fort Washakie superintendent Terry Ebert said the draft bill doesn’t meet the initial goal because it does not require instruction for students.

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Via Hawaiinewsnow.com: US Supreme court justice chooses UH Law graduate to serve as law clerk

An excerpt:

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) –Kamaile Turcan, a graduate of Kamehameha Schools, UC Berkeley and the William S. Richardson School of Law at UH Manoa, has been chosen for a prestigious law clerk position by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor beginning this summer.

This is the first time a UH Law School graduate has been invited to clerk for a United States Supreme Court Justice – as well as the first time that a person of Native Hawaiian ancestry has served as a law clerk to any Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

“The opportunity to work on some of the biggest legal questions of our day, to help Justice Sotomayor, is the ultimate opportunity for a young lawyer and an unparalleled experience,” Turcan said. “It’s an incredible lifetime opportunity for any law graduate, let alone one from Hawai’i, and I have to keep pinching myself.  One of the exciting things about the Court is one never knows what nationally important issue will present itself.”

UH Law Dean Avi Soifer said that he and the Law School are thrilled to have a graduate serve as a clerk in the nation’s highest court. 

“Kamaile is an outstanding example of the high level of achievement and diverse talents of our students,” Soifer said. “For an attorney, one simply cannot do better than to clerk for a United States Supreme Court Justice.  The opportunity for Kamaile to assist and be mentored by Justice Sotomayor, whose life story is so inspiring, is even more special.”

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From The Rapid City Journal: Adding Native American Education Part of State Ed Plan

PIERRE | For the first time in South Dakota, courses about Native Americans will be among the required subjects schools must teach.

The state Board of Education adjusted the schedule for reviewing teaching standards Thursday and added Native American education for all as a subject for the first time.

The revised schedule still calls for the board to adopt any revisions in English language arts in 2018, but in the spring rather than the summer, and to adopt any revisions in math in 2019, again in the spring rather than the summer.

State law requires four public hearings before the board can adopt standards or changes in standards. The standards are used in grades three through eight and grade 11 for testing student achievement. Further details of the requirement for Native American coursework were not discussed Thursday.

Some opponents of the Common Core standards that are now in place have claimed the schedule changes are an attempt to work away from Common Core, but Schopp said after the board meeting Thursday that is not the case.

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