From the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY):

The Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) is calling on Native youth across the country to join our first Generation Indigenous Online Roundtable.  Fill out this brief 5-10 minute survey, share your opinion, win cool stuff. It’s that simple.

Since its launch in 2011, CNAY has traveled to 23 states and connected with more than 5,000 Native youth to better understand their challenges, strengths, and priorities in urban and reservation communities. This is your chance to be part of that conversation.

The Gen-I Online Roundtable is open to Native youth under 25 until September. Everyone who participates will be entered to win one of two full Nike N7 gear packages. Additional prizes will be awarded monthly, including gift cards, t-shirts, and other cool stuff.

We’ll share the results of the survey widely so that Native youth, and those who serve them, can use the information to help raise money and educate their communities. Check out our blog to find more information.

Pull up a chair and join our online roundtable. We can’t wait to hear from you!

The CNAY Team

From Indianz.com, here. Education will be among the top discussion topics.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will hold a business meeting and legislative hearing on May 11. Three items are on the agenda for the business meeting. They are:

S.1163, the Native American Languages Reauthorization Act. The bill extends grants awarded under the Esther Martinez Native American Languages Preservation Act from three years to five years. The committee held a hearing on November 18, 2015.
S.2304, the Tribal Early Childhood, Education, and Related Services Integration Act. The bill creates a demonstration project so tribes, tribal education institutions and tribal organizations can develop early childhood education programs. The committee held a hearing on April 6.
S.2739, the Spokane Tribe of Indians of the Spokane Reservation Equitable Compensation Act. The bill compensates the Spokane Tribe of Washington for land lost to the Grand Coulee Dam. The committee hasn’t held a hearing on the bill during the 114th Congress but prior versions have been advanced in the past.

The legislative hearing will focus on two bills. They are:

S.2417, the Tribal Veterans Health Care Enhancement Act. The bill authorizes the Indian Health Service to cover the cost of veterans’ copays for services rendered at the Veterans Health Administration.
S.2842, the Johnson-O’Malley Supplemental Indian Education Program Modernization Act. The bill updates the decades-old data that the Bureau of Indian Affairs uses to award grants under the Johnson O’Malley (JOM) program.

The meeting and hearing will take place in Room 628 of the Dirksen Senate Office Building.

From EarthSongs, here. An excerpt:

Alaska Native music and dance traditions are unique expressions of culture and spirituality. Each village has its own unique style of dance and music, reflective of a place in its geographic environment and history. In the 1960s and 70s, the Iñupiaq were among the many Native communities who joined together to stand up against the repression of culture and threat on Native lands by the state.

A resurgence began and led to a cultural renaissance for many Alaska Native tribes, alongside the civil rights movement and the influential 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which created several Native regional economic development corporations. This documentary introduces us to the Iñupiaq people who carry on these traditions of song and dance, while sharing stories of their ancestors.

The BYU Education and Law Journal has published “Between a Tomahawk and a Hard Place: Indian mascots and the NCAA” by Stephanie Jade Bollinger.

An excerpt::

Thus, a reviewing court should find that agreements between Native American tribes and Universities granting approval for the use of Indian names as mascots should be void as against public policy. If the approval is found to be void, the NCAA would have a harder time basing approval as the primary factor for exemptions from its own mascot policy at championship games. Without the mascot exemption, more universities may decide to eliminate their use of Indian mascots and, in doing so, discontinue the harmful effects from their use of Indian mascots.

To view the original post on TurtleTalk, click here.