“The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA) continues progress toward Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) promise of equity and real opportunity for every child. Indian education has been a partner throughout this 50-year education effort. Most provisions of ESSA do not take effect until after the 2016-2017 school year, so programs currently are operating under the rules in place prior to the enactment of ESSA. The Department plans to issue revised guidance with regard to funds that are made available for the 2017-2018 school year under the provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended by the ESSA.”

Topics of the 2016 Tribal Consultation include the following:

  • Consultation and communication between local school districts and tribes
  • Indian Education, Title VI (formerly VII)
  • BIE inclusion in the legislation
  • Revitalization and preservation of native languages and culture
  • Improving school climate and suicide prevention

For more information and to register for the consultation (In person-or virtual), please go to http://www.edtribalconsultations.org. We strongly recommend tribal leaders to attend!

Venue: Spokane Convention Center, Room: 302B
(NCAI Mid-Year Conference & Marketplace)
334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane Washington 99201
Date: June 27, 2016
Time: 9:00am- 12:00pm (PT)

The Common Core State Standards in math and English/language arts have gotten a lot of attention over the past few years, fueling debate about how best to set goals for student learning. But another set of new standards-these for science-has been redefining instruction in American classrooms with much less controversy. The Next Generation Science Standards, being implemented in 18 states, emphasize learning science by doing science.

Wyoming has not yet adopted the standards, but some school districts, like Campbell County, aren’t waiting for the state to take action.

“We’re not teaching out of a textbook anymore,” says 4th grade teacher Jamie Howe. “It’s more hands on and students are taking control of their own learning.”

Although this more active way of teaching is fueling enthusiasm, it also faces significant challenges. Schools across the nation spend less time on science and more on math and reading, and educators in small schools with few science teachers must adapt in not just one subject, but three or four.

John Tulenko of Education Week visited Wyoming this spring to learn how the Next Generation Science Standards are changing K-12 science classes.

LEARN MORE TONIGHT ON PBS NEWSHOUR.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                      

June 9, 2016

Washington, D.C.– Earlier this week, the Department of Education (ED) released a first look at the data collected in the 2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) Report. The CRDC is a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States. The survey measures student access to resources, as well as information on factors like school discipline and bullying. As other reports have shown, Native students continue to face obstacles that impact their academic success. Highlights from the report show the harsh realities our students experience in public schools including:

  • Native students are disproportionately suspended from school.
  • Native high school students are also retained disproportionately.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native (26%), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (25%) high school students are chronically absent.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native boys represent 0.6% of all students, but 2% of students expelled without educational services.
  • More than one out of five American Indian or Alaska Native (22%) and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (23%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA received one or more out-of-school suspensions, compared to one out of ten white (10%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA.

Secretary of Education, John King, said of the report, “The Obama Administration has always stressed how data can empower parents, educators and policy makers to make informed decisions about how to better serve students. The stories the CRDC data tell us create the imperative for a continued call to action to do better and close achievement and opportunity gaps.”

NIEA Executive Director Ahniwake Rose agreed saying, “This report confirms what Native education advocates have always known-gaps persist that impact the success of our students. However, it only provides one chapter of a larger story. When looking at reports that assess the innovative solutions tribes have started to implement:  culture-based education, language immersion programs, community input, and support work, we know tribal communities have the ability to reverse these statistics. NIEA hopes the CRDC report provides an opportunity to begin a national discussion on how to expand these solutions and provide the flexibility and support to make them work.”

Throughout 2016, the ED will continue to release data highlights that relay information about issues that impact student success.

To view the CRDC report, please click here.

Click here to learn more about NIEA.