LIGHTING THE PATHWAY TO FACULTY CAREERS FOR NATIVES IN STEM

From AISES:

AISES is now accepting applications for the 3rd LTP cohort!
All applications and supporting documents must be received by August 19, 2016.

DESCRIPTION

AISES was awarded a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create the “Lighting the Pathway to Faculty Careers for Natives in STEM” program.  The program’s goal is to increase the representation of American Indians, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiians in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) faculty positions at universities and tribal colleges across the country.  The program aims to create an intergenerational community of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, and junior and senior faculty members.  This full circle of support will help guide students to successful degree completion and advancement to the next stage on the academic career path.  In addition to full circle mentorship, the program strives to provide students with valuable academic and professional support, travel funding, and educational, research, fellowship, and internship opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY

  • Full time college undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoctoral scholar in a field within Biological Sciences, Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Geosciences, Computer and Information Science and Engineering, or Engineering at an accredited four-year college/university or two-year college.  Must be enrolled in a program leading to an academic degree.
  • Interest in becoming a faculty member at a college, university, or tribal college.
  • Have a 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) or higher cumulative grade point average (GPA), with consideration being given to applicants reflecting somewhat lower GPAs but with high potential to raise the GPA above 3.0.
  • Current member of AISES.

Selection of students will seek balance with respect to a diversity of tribes, geographic areas in the United States, STEM majors, and gender. While the focus is primarily on American Indians, Alaskan Natives, and Native Hawaiians, all AISES members are eligible. The selection process will attempt to ensure that a diversity of STEM disciplines is reflected.

Scholars in the program will receive an annual participation stipend of $2,250 for two years, and two years of travel funding to attend the AISES National Conference and AISES Leadership Summit or discipline-specific professional conference.  Scholars will be matched with an AISES selected faculty mentor to interact with at least monthly.  Scholars are required to participate in skill-building, professional-development in-person programming and webinars.  Finally, scholars will have the opportunity to engage in an active community of Native STEM researchers.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS:

  • You must be either an undergraduate student, graduate student, or post-doctoral fellow to apply.
  • Complete the “Lighting the Pathway” application online: www.aises.org/pathways2016
  • Submit the following supporting documents to kcoulon@aises.org(link sends e-mail):
    • Unofficial transcript(s)
    • CV/Resume
    • One Letter of Recommendation
  • Application and supporting documents are due August 19, 2016 by 5:00pm (applicant’s time zone)

If you have any questions, please contact Kyle Coulon at kcoulon@aises.org(link sends e-mail).

A link to begin the application can be found here

7 Books by Native Writers to Slow the “Summer Slide”

From Indian Country Today:

Summer reading can help slow down the “summer slide,” a term educational researchers use to describe the loss of academic skills over the months that kids aren’t in school. With the following books, parents can put the brakes on that slide, and give their kids’ identities a boost.

Below are some outstanding books by Native writers. Buy them if you can, or ask for them at your local library. Librarians want to know what readers want to read. Far too many books by Native writers aren’t reviewed in the review journals librarians use to select books. You’ll be helping them by asking for these books.

Let’s start with a road trip story. Joseph Marshall III’sIn the Footsteps of Crazy Horse(Harry N. Abrams, 2015) has a lot going for it. First off, it’s set in the present day. The main character, Jimmy, is Lakota. But, he has blue eyes and light brown hair because his lineage includes people who aren’t Native. That means he gets teased for his looks. In steps his grandpa, who takes him on a road trip. As they drive, Jimmy learns about Crazy Horse, but he also learns that Native people have different names for places. One example is the Oregon Trail. Jimmy’s grandpa tells him that Native people call it Shell River Road. Marshall’s storytelling is vibrant and engaging, and the perfect tone for kids in middle school.

Start your summer reading journey with this road trip story by Joseph Marshall III.
Start your summer reading journey with this road trip story by Joseph Marshall III.

You can’t miss with Arigon Starr’sSuper Indian(Wacky Productions Unlimited) stories. She’s got the inside track on telling it like it is. Or, could be, if eating commodity cheese could give you super powers. In other words, every panel of Starr’s comics is a reflection of Native life, and she brilliantly pokes at the uber popularTwilightbooks and movies, and testy issues like blood quantum. There’s a ka-pow to thissuper power series(two volumes at this point) that will have you and your kids laughing out loud.

RELATED:A Chat With Arigon Starr, Creator of ‘Super Indian’ Comics

Arigon Starr’s “Super Indian” comics poke fun at many topics.
Arigon Starr’s “Super Indian” comics poke fun at many topics.

Richard Van Camp’sA Blanket of Butterflies(HighWater Press, 2015) is riveting. This graphic novel opens with a boy who looks to be in his early teens, standing in front of a samurai suit of armor in a display case in his tribe’s museum. That suit is going to be returned to its original owner, but the sword is missing. That launches this fast-paced story in which Van Camp provides us with an opportunity to think about museums and who owns items in them.

This book will have students thinking about who owns items in museum collections.
This book will have students thinking about who owns items in museum collections.

For your older kids, take a look atMoonshot(Alternate History Comics Inc., 2015).In it, you’ll find a collection of short stories by Native writers, told in graphic novel format. There is a wide range of voice, style, and tribal nation. Getting to know the writers in this collection can lead readers to other works by Native writers whose stories are inMoonshot.

This collection of short stories will give students a glimpse at the work of a number of Native writers.
This collection of short stories will give students a glimpse at the work of a number of Native writers.

We must not forget your younger kids. For many Native people, berry picking is part of our summer activity. In Julie Flett’sWild Berries(Simply Read Books, 2014), a little boy named Clarence and his grandma are out picking blueberries. They sing as they go. And of course, they eat some berries as they gather them. Clarence sees a fox, and a spider web, and, an ant crawls on him at one point. A huge plus is that you can get and read the book in English, or in Cree.

Follow a young boy and his grandmother as they go berry picking.
Follow a young boy and his grandmother as they go berry picking.

Many of you will be going to gatherings of one sort or another. Check out Cheryl Minnema’sHungry Johnny(Minnesota Historical Society Press, 2014). In it, a little boy—named Johnny, of course—comes home and spies a plate of sweet rolls on the counter. He heads straight for that plate, but his grandma stops him, saying “Bekaa, these are for the community feast.” Bekaa is Ojibwe for “wait.” Waiting is tough on Johnny. He’s got to wait while the elders at the feast pray, and then he’s got to wait for them to eat first. Will there be any rolls left for Johnny? Minnema’s use of Ojibwe and English is great. A lot of families talk to each other using a mix of their Native tongue and English. And that feast is like ones so many Native kids go to all the time.

RELATED:‘Hungry Johnny’ Dishes Up Elder Knowledge, Native Culture in Children’s Book

Hungry Johnny must be patient in this children’s book.
Hungry Johnny must be patient in this children’s book.

One last suggestion is Marcie Rendon’sPowwow Summer: A Family Celebrates the Circle of Life(Carolrhoda Books, 1996). It is a nonfiction photo essay about a family on the powwow circuit. Rendon’s words, coupled with photographs by Cheryl Walsh Bellville, are a delight. Those of you who go to summer powwows know exactly what it’s like to be out there, but being able to give your kids a book that reflects what you’re all doing: priceless.

(Written By Debbie Reese)

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/07/20/7-books-native-writers-slow-summer-slide-165153

Applications for BIE Director Now Being Accepted

Applications must be filed online.

The closing date is August 8.

Preference will be given to persons of Indian descent who are:

(a) Members of any recognized Indian tribe now under Federal jurisdiction;

(b) Descendants of such members who were, on June 1, 1934, residing within the present boundaries of any Indian reservation;

(c) All others of one-half or more Indian blood of tribes indigenous to the U.S., and

(d) Eskimos and other aboriginal people in Alaska,” according to 25CFR 5.1.

You can read more about the position here.

We R Native Photo Contest

We know that culture plays an important role in maintaining and improving our community’s health. Whether it’s hitting the powwow trail or pulling in canoe journey, summer is a great time to connect with your culture. We know that culture plays an important role in maintaining and improving our community’s health. Encourage youth you know to get involved in cultural activities and share their experience by entering this month’s We R Native contest.

ELIGIBILITY:

American Indian and Alaska Native youth 15-24 years old
TO APPLY:

Youth can enter online or by sharing their story on social media using #REPRESENT
Fill out online form here.

DEADLINE:

August 20th, 2016

AWARD:

Stories will be featured on weRnative.org and youth will be entered to win up to $150 (1st place), $100 (2nd place), or $75 (3rd place)!
For more information:

Go to weRnative.org to learn more and get started on your application!

Additionally, you can contact 503.416.3307 or email native@npaihb.org for more information, including answers to questions, instructions and guidelines

By submitting an entry, you grant the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) the right to use, edit, and disseminate submissions in print, online, and through other forms of media for educational, public service, or health awareness purposes. By submitting an entry, you release the NPAIHB and its agents and employees from all claims, demands, and liabilities whatsoever in connection with the above. For more information click here.

We encourage you to visit our website for a comprehensive list of available resources (scholarships, fellowships, summer programs, grant opportunities, etc.). Thank you for your continued support and interest in the Center for Native American Youth and Generation Indigenous.

 

Center for Native American Youth
http://www.cnay.org
cnayinfo@aspeninstitute.org

The U.S. Department of Education 2016 Tribal Consultation, June 27

 


“The Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (ESSA) continues progress toward Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) promise of equity and real opportunity for every child. Indian education has been a partner throughout this 50-year education effort. Most provisions of ESSA do not take effect until after the 2016-2017 school year, so programs currently are operating under the rules in place prior to the enactment of ESSA. The Department plans to issue revised guidance with regard to funds that are made available for the 2017-2018 school year under the provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act as amended by the ESSA.”

Topics of the 2016 Tribal Consultation include the following:

  • Consultation and communication between local school districts and tribes
  • Indian Education, Title VI (formerly VII)
  • BIE inclusion in the legislation
  • Revitalization and preservation of native languages and culture
  • Improving school climate and suicide prevention

For more information and to register for the consultation (In person-or virtual), please go to http://www.edtribalconsultations.org. We strongly recommend tribal leaders to attend!

Venue: Spokane Convention Center, Room: 302B
(NCAI Mid-Year Conference & Marketplace)
334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., Spokane Washington 99201
Date: June 27, 2016
Time: 9:00am- 12:00pm (PT)

Airing Tonight on PBS NewsHour: Education Week Reports: A New Vision for Science Education

The Common Core State Standards in math and English/language arts have gotten a lot of attention over the past few years, fueling debate about how best to set goals for student learning. But another set of new standards-these for science-has been redefining instruction in American classrooms with much less controversy. The Next Generation Science Standards, being implemented in 18 states, emphasize learning science by doing science.

Wyoming has not yet adopted the standards, but some school districts, like Campbell County, aren’t waiting for the state to take action.

“We’re not teaching out of a textbook anymore,” says 4th grade teacher Jamie Howe. “It’s more hands on and students are taking control of their own learning.”

Although this more active way of teaching is fueling enthusiasm, it also faces significant challenges. Schools across the nation spend less time on science and more on math and reading, and educators in small schools with few science teachers must adapt in not just one subject, but three or four.

John Tulenko of Education Week visited Wyoming this spring to learn how the Next Generation Science Standards are changing K-12 science classes.

LEARN MORE TONIGHT ON PBS NEWSHOUR.

Check Local Listings

DOE Releases Civil Rights Data Collection Report

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                      

June 9, 2016

Washington, D.C.– Earlier this week, the Department of Education (ED) released a first look at the data collected in the 2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) Report. The CRDC is a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States. The survey measures student access to resources, as well as information on factors like school discipline and bullying. As other reports have shown, Native students continue to face obstacles that impact their academic success. Highlights from the report show the harsh realities our students experience in public schools including:

  • Native students are disproportionately suspended from school.
  • Native high school students are also retained disproportionately.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native (26%), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (25%) high school students are chronically absent.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native boys represent 0.6% of all students, but 2% of students expelled without educational services.
  • More than one out of five American Indian or Alaska Native (22%) and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (23%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA received one or more out-of-school suspensions, compared to one out of ten white (10%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA.

Secretary of Education, John King, said of the report, “The Obama Administration has always stressed how data can empower parents, educators and policy makers to make informed decisions about how to better serve students. The stories the CRDC data tell us create the imperative for a continued call to action to do better and close achievement and opportunity gaps.”

NIEA Executive Director Ahniwake Rose agreed saying, “This report confirms what Native education advocates have always known-gaps persist that impact the success of our students. However, it only provides one chapter of a larger story. When looking at reports that assess the innovative solutions tribes have started to implement:  culture-based education, language immersion programs, community input, and support work, we know tribal communities have the ability to reverse these statistics. NIEA hopes the CRDC report provides an opportunity to begin a national discussion on how to expand these solutions and provide the flexibility and support to make them work.”

Throughout 2016, the ED will continue to release data highlights that relay information about issues that impact student success.

To view the CRDC report, please click here.

Click here to learn more about NIEA.