8 Facts Parents Need to Know About Tribal Consultation in Public Education

U.S. Department of Education, OESE Dear Colleague Letter “Tribal Consultation FAQ”

The U.S. Department of Education recently issued guidance detailing the steps states and school districts must take to help ensure the ideas, opinions, and requests of tribal leaders, educators and organizations are heard, respected and considered. Almost half a million AI/AN students attend public schools, representing more than 90 percent of the AI/AN school-age population. […]

Read full article at Indian Country Today Media Network

Click for USDE Dear Colleague Letter ESSA FAQ on Tribal Consultation Guidance

White House Initiative American Indian and Alaska Native Education School Environment Listening Sessions Report

Here. An excerpt from the Executive Summary:

To improve education for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) students, tribal leaders, educators, and Native youth called upon WHIAIANE to collect information on school environment experiences — from teachers, parents, community members, and the students themselves. Tribal leaders and tribal communities wanted members of the initiative to hear about the challenges these students face in gaining high-quality education, with a focus on the quality of their school environments.

To meet this need, WHIAIANE, in collaboration with OCR, worked with tribal leaders and communities to design and execute a series of nationwide listening sessions regarding the school environments of AI/AN students. In October and November 2014, nine gatherings were held in seven states from New York to California to Alaska.

These sessions drew over 1,000 attendees in total and allowed WHIAIANE and OCR to gather information from all stakeholders in AI/AN education. WHIAIANE acted as a listener, allowing students and others to speak openly about their school environments.

“You just have to be you, and you just have to be real. The only way to change things is to hear from real people,” said Valerie Davidson, trustee of the First Alaskans Institute, who served as the moderator for the listening session in Anchorage, Alaska. WHIAIANE imparted similar instructions at each session in an effort to encourage a safe environment for participants to share their stories.

Throughout the sessions, the initiative collected information about the challenges related to school climate, including bullying, student discipline, potentially harmful Native imagery and symbolism, and the implications of all of these school climate issues. With regard to Native school mascots and symbols, the initiative is aware that some people strongly favor retaining their school mascots. During the listening sessions, however, initiative staff members did not hear this viewpoint; thus it is not reflected in this report.

WHIAIANE found feedback from these sessions invaluable in forming its recommended next steps. The initiative further expects that information from these sessions will guide its future work and goals — to address the unique and culturally related academic needs of AI/AN students and to ensure that they receive an excellent education.

 

White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education Stakeholder Call

TOPIC: SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT LISTENING SESSIONS FINAL REPORT
U.S. Department of Education


On October 15, White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education (WHIAIANE) released a school environment report called the School Environment Listening Sessions Final Report. The report was released and announced by William Mendoza, Executive Director of WHIAIANE at the National Indian Education Association’s Convention in Portland, Oregon.

As part of the school environment listening sessions WHIAIANE heard from Native youth, schools and communities on ways to better meet the unique educational and culturally-related academic needs of Native American students.

Throughout the sessions, WHIAIANE collected information about the challenges related to school environment including bullying, student discipline, potentially harmful Native American imagery and symbolism, and the implications of all of these school environment issues.

The School Environment Listening Sessions Final Report is a summary of the findings from the October and November 2014 listening sessions. It identifies common issues and suggests recommendations to address the concerns shared by teachers, parents, community members, and students.

Please join us for a brief conference call about the contents of this report. The Department of Education press release is available on the ed.gov website. The School Environment Listening Sessions Final Report on the WHIAIANE website under the Native Youth Environment Initiative tab.

October 29, 2015
1:00pm – 2:00pm EST
Number: 1-888-946-3504
Participant Passcode: 6958855

For more information, click here.

Webinar on BIE Reorganization

Tue, Oct 13, 2015 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM MDT

Join NCAI and the Bureau of Indian Education to hear the latest information pertaining to the BIE reorganization efforts. This webinar will be an opportunity for tribal leaders, educators, and other stakeholders to hear about the goals of the BIE reorganization and how the proposed plan for realignment (letter to Representative Calvert attached) will improve the delivery of educational services to Native students consistent with the Blueprint for Reform.

Denise Desiderio, Policy Director – NCAI (Introduction)
Charles (Monty) Roessel, Director – Bureau of Indian Education
Don Yu, Chief Schools Transformation Officer

Register here.

NATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL ON INDIAN EDUCATION MEETING SCHEDULED FOR SEPTEMBER 25, 2015

Here.

The National Advisory Council on Indian Education have scheduled a teleconference meetng for September 25, 2015. The notice was published in the September 14 Federal Register located here: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2015-09-14/pdf/2015-22891.pdf. The purpose of the meeting is to convene the Council to conduct the following business: (1) Final discussion, review and approval of the annual report to Congress; and, (2) Discuss schedule to submit recommendations to the Secretary of Education on funding and administration of programs. The Council is established within the Department of Education to advise the Secretary of Education on the funding and administration (including the development of regulations, and administrative policies and practices) of any program over which the Secretary has jurisdiction and includes Indian children or adults as participants or programs that may benefit Indian children or adults, including any program established under Title VII, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The Council submits to the Congress a report on the activities of the Council that includes recommendations the Council considers appropriate for the improvement of Federal education programs that include Indian children or adults as participants or that may benefit Indian children or adults, and recommendations concerning the funding of any such program. The NACIE teleconference meeting will be held via conference call on September 25, 2015—2:00 p.m.–2:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Saving Time. Up to 20 dial-in, listen only phone lines will be made available to the public on a first come, first served basis. The conference call number is 1–800–857–9682 and the participant code is 5273162. See the Federal Register for details.
(September 15, 2015)

Notice Of Request For Comments – Renewal of Agency Information Collection for the Bureau of Indian Education Tribal Education Department Grant Program; Request for Comments

Here is the notice, and the entire PDF copy is here.  Deadline to respond is November 2, 2015.  From the abstract:

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is seeking renewal of the approval for information collection conducted under 25 U.S.C. 2020, for the solicitation of grant proposals from Federally-recognized tribes and their Tribal Education Departments (TEDs) that will fund program goals to promote tribal education capacity building to include:

  • Development and enforcement of tribal educational codes, including tribal education policies and tribal standards applicable to curriculum, personnel, students, facilities, and support programs;
  • Facilitate tribal control in all matters relating to the education of Indian children on reservations (and onformer Indian reservations in Oklahoma);
  • Provide development of coordinated educational programs (including all preschool, elementary, secondary, and higher or vocational educational programs) on reservations (and on former Indian reservations in Oklahoma) by encouraging tribal administrative support of all Bureau-funded educational programs, as well as encouraging tribal cooperation and coordination with entities carrying out all educational programs receiving financial support from other Federal agencies, State agencies, or private entities.

A response is required to obtain or retain a benefit, thus it is very important for Tribes and TEDs to provide comments.

You may submit comments on the information collection to Ms. Wendy Greyeyes, Bureau of Indian Education, Office of the BIE Director, 1849 C Street NW., MS-4657-MIB, Washington, DC 20240; email Wendy.Greyeyes@bie.edu.

Dr. Sherry Johnson on the Impact Aid Consultation

I was on the Tribal Consultation webinar and my take on it was: There are no plans to change the Impact Aid law itself but merely the wording within the guidelines. We need to push for stronger clearer language within the law itself. What were minimum requirements of past no longer meet today’s needs for Indian children and there parents. We need to stand together and push for changes. Stronger verbage for the IPP requirements, definitions and clarifications of Assessments, reporting, equal participation and more. I will be writing a formal statement in regards to the Tribal Consultation.

Dr. Sherry Johnson is the Tribal Education Director for the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, which is a member of TEDNA.

If you missed it, here are the documents from the consultation: Impact Aid Consultation PPT and the Impact Aid Regulations.  There is another consultation scheduled for:

  • Tuesday, July 28th at 2:30pm EST

There is limited space, so please register.

To register:

1) Visit http://educate.webex.com

2) In the header menu, click on Training Center, then the Upcoming tab.

3) Select the session you would like to attend and click the registration link on the right hand side of the page. The registration password is Consult16.

4) Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with a link to the Webex session, as well as instructions for how to dial in to the proceedings.

 

Impact Aid Tribal Consultation

The Impact Aid Program is considering whether to propose changes to its regulations at 34 CFR Part 222. The Department of Education (ED) is seeking input on whether there should be changes made to the regulations governing Indian Policies and Procedures, and if so, what changes should be made. ED is offering to online consultation sessions:

  • Wednesday, July 15th at 2:30pm EST
  • Tuesday, July 28th at 2:30pm EST

There is limited space, so please register.

To register:

1) Visit http://educate.webex.com

2) In the header menu, click on Training Center, then the Upcoming tab.

3) Select the session you would like to attend and click the registration link on the right hand side of the page. The registration password is Consult16.

4) Once registered, you will receive a confirmation email with a link to the Webex session, as well as instructions for how to dial in to the proceedings.

Federal Register Notice on BIA/BIE TED Grants

Here. An excerpt:

SUMMARY: The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) announces the availability of grants to tribes and their tribal education departments for projects identified at 25 U.S.C. 2020.
This notice invites tribes with BIE funded schools on or near Indian lands
to submit grant proposals.
DATES: Grant proposals must be received by June 15, 2015, at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. The BIE will hold pre application training sessions, see
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for more information.