Visiting Indigenous Scholarship Fellowship

The University of Victoria in Canada is establishing a fellowship for a Visiting Indigenous Scholar to be appointed to the faculty. The fellowship is valued at $10,000 for the semester.

The application deadline is September 19, 2016. To apply: please submit a cover letter and resume to Dr. Margaret Cameron, Associate Dean Research, Faculty of Humanities at margaret@uvic.ca.

For more information please see the flyer below.

Visiting Indigenous Scholar Fellowship – 2016-17

 

 

“Know Before ‘U’ Go”

Know Before “U” Go is a college preparation program designed by the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC). The program teaches about post-secondary education, financial aid, and scholarships for the upcoming fall of 2016. They will have two locations set up. The first location is in Seattle, Washington in October and the second location in Rapid City, South Dakota in December. Click the link below to find out more details.

http://www.aigcs.org/

DOE Releases Civil Rights Data Collection Report

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                      

June 9, 2016

Washington, D.C.– Earlier this week, the Department of Education (ED) released a first look at the data collected in the 2013-2014 Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC) Report. The CRDC is a survey of all public schools and school districts in the United States. The survey measures student access to resources, as well as information on factors like school discipline and bullying. As other reports have shown, Native students continue to face obstacles that impact their academic success. Highlights from the report show the harsh realities our students experience in public schools including:

  • Native students are disproportionately suspended from school.
  • Native high school students are also retained disproportionately.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native (26%), Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (25%) high school students are chronically absent.
  • American Indian or Alaska Native boys represent 0.6% of all students, but 2% of students expelled without educational services.
  • More than one out of five American Indian or Alaska Native (22%) and Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander (23%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA received one or more out-of-school suspensions, compared to one out of ten white (10%) boys with disabilities served by IDEA.

Secretary of Education, John King, said of the report, “The Obama Administration has always stressed how data can empower parents, educators and policy makers to make informed decisions about how to better serve students. The stories the CRDC data tell us create the imperative for a continued call to action to do better and close achievement and opportunity gaps.”

NIEA Executive Director Ahniwake Rose agreed saying, “This report confirms what Native education advocates have always known-gaps persist that impact the success of our students. However, it only provides one chapter of a larger story. When looking at reports that assess the innovative solutions tribes have started to implement:  culture-based education, language immersion programs, community input, and support work, we know tribal communities have the ability to reverse these statistics. NIEA hopes the CRDC report provides an opportunity to begin a national discussion on how to expand these solutions and provide the flexibility and support to make them work.”

Throughout 2016, the ED will continue to release data highlights that relay information about issues that impact student success.

To view the CRDC report, please click here.

Click here to learn more about NIEA.

Elizabeth Reese: The Making of a Modern Warrior

From Harvard Law Today:

Being Native American defines Elizabeth Reese ’16. Then again, so does being the granddaughter of a Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania. Together, the two have helped shape a woman and a lawyer.

Reese was raised 20 miles north of Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the foot of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, as a member of the Pueblo of Nambé tribe. The village there is small and old—it dates back to the 14th century—as is the tribe that makes the reservation home. Some 1,100 members of the 2,000-person Nambé tribe live on the 20,000-acre reservation, which is filled with cottonwoods, juniper, and scrub oak, and surrounded by sandstone and mountains and river. Such isolation has helped the community maintain its culture and traditions.

Reese was raised squarely in that community and in that culture, although she’s always felt she belonged in two very different worlds. She grew being called Elizabeth but also Yunpovi (which means Willow Flower in the Tewa language). She may have been surrounded by scrub pine, but her father read her Homer as a child, which helped her navigate traditionally elite white spaces more easily than she might have otherwise.

She considered her educational journey an opportunity to learn things that would aid her in making a difference for her people—for her tribe specifically, but for native people more broadly. First, she went to Yale.

“When I went off to school at Yale I really wanted to make sure I understood the world of education and power that exists in America, because that world is something few Indian people have been a part of and understood,” says Reese. “And yet, that’s where so many decisions that impact us and define what will happen to us get made.”

As an undergraduate she developed a background in political theory, which led her to England and the University of Cambridge. There she earned a Master of Philosophy in political thought and intellectual history and did work on Indian political theory. She counts herself as one of the first Native Americans to attend the university and one of the first scholars there to focus on Indian ideas.

Reese’s commitment to the study—and protection—of Native concerns led her to Harvard Law School and shaped her focus during her three years. She built visibility, programming, and recruitment as a leader in the HLS Native American Law Students Association. She helped to write a District Court amicus brief intervening in a tribal water jurisdiction case through the Native Amicus Briefing Project. She also served as a congressional intern and a fellow for the Senate Judiciary Committee, and interned at the Department of Justice in the civil rights division.

Now she is hoping to become a warrior.

“There’s a common theme in Indian society that lawyers are the modern warriors for Indian people,” says Reese. “I’m really excited to become one of those warriors and to join the fight to ensure that tribal sovereignty survives for my children, my grandchildren, and my great grandchildren.”

After graduation Reese will clerk for Judge Amul R. Thapar at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Kentucky. Late in the year she’ll head to Washington, D.C., as a Public Service Venture Fund Redstone Fellow at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. The breadth of cases she’ll be part of—from litigating voting rights on one side of the country to school desegregation on the other side—excites her.

While Reese hopes to spend the early part of her career working on civil rights cases that affect the lives of people of color in the U.S—including her family members—she also hopes to someday practice Indian law. After all it’s the law, she says, that determines whether or not Indian tribes survive.

“It can’t be understated how fragile our future is—how our survival is still something we have to fight for,” says Reese. “Unlike a lot of other groups or identities, this is our only homeland. Our culture exists nowhere else in the world if we fail to ensure its survival here. I take that challenge very seriously and hope I can do all I can to protect my tribe and my people and our sovereignty.”

Congratulations Elizabeth!

Congress Passes the Native American Children’s Safety Act

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Senator John Barrasso (R-WY), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, praised Congress’ passage of S. 184, the Native American Children’s Safety Act. The bill was sponsored by Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND), with bipartisan support.

S. 184 amends the Indian Child Protection and Family Violence Prevention Act to require background checks before foster care placements are ordered in tribal court proceedings. The bill passed out of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on Feb. 2, 2015, and passed the full Senate on June 1, 2015. The bill passed the House of Representatives on May 23, 2016.

“Protecting Native children is paramount,” said Barrasso. “Requiring background checks for potential foster care parents of Indian children is just common sense. I want to thank Senator Hoeven for his leadership in introducing this important bill, and I call on the president to sign it into law as soon as possible.”

“Our bill ensures that Native American children living on reservations have all of the same protections when assigned to foster care that children living off the reservation have,” Hoeven said. “The measure requires background checks for all adults living in a foster home, which will help to protect children placed there at an already difficult time in their lives.”

ANNOUNCEMENT: 2016 Professional Development Program Application Now Open!

The Office of Indian Education Professional Development Program competition opened on May 17, 2016 and closes on July 1, 2016. The purposes of the Indian Education Professional Development Grants program are to:

  1. increase the number of qualified Indian individuals in professions that serve Indians;
  2. provide training to qualified Indian individuals to become teachers, administrators, teacher aides, social workers, and ancillary educational personnel; and
  3. improve the skills of qualified Indian individuals who serve in the education field.

The notice was published in the Federal Register at this link: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-17/pdf/2016-11606.pdf.

Interested applicants will need to use the grants.gov website to apply at http://www.grants.gov. The Grants.Gov Opportunity Number is: ED-GRANTS-051716-001.

For more information you may click here: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/indianprofdev/applicant.html.

Share Your Perspective for a Chance to Win Nike Gear Provided by CNAY!

From the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY):

The Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) is calling on Native youth across the country to join our first Generation Indigenous Online Roundtable.  Fill out this brief 5-10 minute survey, share your opinion, win cool stuff. It’s that simple.

Since its launch in 2011, CNAY has traveled to 23 states and connected with more than 5,000 Native youth to better understand their challenges, strengths, and priorities in urban and reservation communities. This is your chance to be part of that conversation.

The Gen-I Online Roundtable is open to Native youth under 25 until September. Everyone who participates will be entered to win one of two full Nike N7 gear packages. Additional prizes will be awarded monthly, including gift cards, t-shirts, and other cool stuff.

We’ll share the results of the survey widely so that Native youth, and those who serve them, can use the information to help raise money and educate their communities. Check out our blog to find more information.

Pull up a chair and join our online roundtable. We can’t wait to hear from you!

The CNAY Team

NNABA FOUNDATION COLLABORATES WITH THE STATE BAR OF SOUTH DAKOTA AND SOUTH DAKOTA INDIAN COUNTRY BAR ASSOCIATION IN PIPELINE EFFORT

Phoenix, AZ – This month, the NNABA Foundation, in partnership with The State Bar of South Dakota and the South Dakota Indian Country Bar Association, will launch the Native American Pipeline to Law School in Rapid City, South Dakota. Over the course of three days, President Linda Benally, NNABA, along with Eric C. Schulte, President of The State Bar of South Dakota and Seth Pearman, President of the South Dakota Indian Country Bar Association will visit tribal colleges, tribal high schools, and other universities to encourage interest among students to pursue law careers. They will be joined by other representatives from all three organizations.

In order to raise the visibility of Native American attorneys in the legal profession at large, to effectuate lasting reforms in the legal community, and to help build a pipeline to law school, NNABA conducted the first-of-its-kind study of Native American attorneys. The Pursuit of Inclusion: An In-Depth Exploration of the Experiences and Perspectives of Native American Attorneys in the Legal Professionprovides the first comprehensive picture of the issues confronting Native American attorneys across all settings – including private practice; government practice in state, federal and tribal arenas; the judiciary; corporate legal departments; and academia.

One of the goals of the study is for others to use the findings to develop educational materials and programs to help improve the recruitment, hiring, retention and advancement of Native American attorneys in the legal profession. The State Bar of South Dakota’s Native American Pipeline to Law School outreach does just that. The NNABA Foundation is incredibly proud to partner with these organizations. This partnership has the potential to achieve favorable results in increasing the number of Native American law students.

Tours are being scheduled for September 28 – October 2, 2015. If you are interested in participating in this important effort, please contact NNABA at adminassistant@nativeamericanbar.org for more information.

To learn more about The Pursuit of Inclusion: An In-Depth Exploration of the Experiences and Perspectives of Native American Attorneys in the Legal Profession, click HERE.

Established in 2014, the NNABA Foundation works to foster development of Native American lawyers and addressing social, cultural and legal issues affecting American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians, through the grant of scholarships to law students, the organization of seminars and conferences on topics of interest to the legal profession, and the preparation and distribution of articles and reports on legal issues.