Tue, Oct 13, 2015 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM MDT

Join NCAI and the Bureau of Indian Education to hear the latest information pertaining to the BIE reorganization efforts. This webinar will be an opportunity for tribal leaders, educators, and other stakeholders to hear about the goals of the BIE reorganization and how the proposed plan for realignment (letter to Representative Calvert attached) will improve the delivery of educational services to Native students consistent with the Blueprint for Reform.

Denise Desiderio, Policy Director – NCAI (Introduction)
Charles (Monty) Roessel, Director – Bureau of Indian Education
Don Yu, Chief Schools Transformation Officer

Register here.

Here.  An excerpt:

SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

  • Must be majoring in a business related field
  • Must be a junior, senior or graduate student
  • Must be enrolled as a full-time student
  • Must be enrolled at an accredited post-secondary institution of higher education
  • If selected, candidate must be able to attend the NCAIED Scholarship Awards Luncheon

(Expenses including lodging, ground transportation and airfare within the U.S. will be provided by NCAIED)
*Important: If selected a candidate is unable to attend, award will be forfeited.

From the Dep’t of Education, here. An excerpt:

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the award of more than $5.3 million in grants to help Native American youth become college- and career-ready.

Under the new Native Youth Community Projects (NYCP) program, the Department is making grants to a dozen recipients in nine states that will impact more than thirty tribes and involve more than 48 schools. These awards are a demonstration of President Obama’s strong commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaska Native children and a key element of his Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative to help Native American youth.

“These grants are an unprecedented investment in Native youth, and a recognition that tribal communities are best positioned to drive solutions and lead change,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “These grants are a down payment on President Obama’s commitment last summer at his historic trip to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota to create new opportunities for American Indian youth to cultivate the next generation of Native leaders.”

TEDNA was one of the grantees, and its abstract is below.

The purpose of the Tribal Education Department National Assembly (TEDNA) Native Youth Community Partners (NYCP) Project (hereafter referred to as the TEDNA NYCP Project) is to develop, test, and demonstrate effectiveness of College and Career Readiness services and supports to improve the educational opportunities and achievement of Indian students in middle and junior high school among four tribes: the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, the Absentee Shawnee Tribe, The Muscogee (Creek) Nation, and the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. The TEDNA NYCP Project is expected to achieve the goal that all participating Grade 6-9 Indian students will improve College and Career Readiness as defined by a successful transition into high school with a GPA greater than 2.0. The project will develop a plan that addresses and supports College and Career Readiness that is locally informed. The TEDNA NYCP Project will use community-based strategies that improve high school success among Indian students by measuring behaviors and psychosocial attributes early in their academic experience that are often overlooked in standardized tests, but critical components of their academic success. Measureable objectives of the project are: (a) to increase the academic Achievement of participating Indian students in Grades 6-9 to be College and Career Ready; (b) to increase informed College and Career Planning with Indian students in Grades 6-9; and (c) to build a College and Career Readiness Culture so that everyone, especially educators, community, students, and families ALL believe that Indian students are capable of success in College and Career.

From ICT, here. An excerpt:

Isleta Pueblo has taken over the Isleta Elementary School, which since its founding in the 1890s had been under the control of the federal government. The difference in school morale and the children’s behavior, say school officials, is already evident. And it was certainly easy to see the day ICTMN visited—bubbly, friendly, well-behaved children, smiling teachers only too eager to show off their classrooms, and committed staff who took time to share their programs and plans for the future.

The transfer was official July 1. Just a few days before school started in August Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn, Bureau of Indian Education Director Charles Roessel and Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M, joined Isleta Pueblo Gov. E. Paul Torres at the school to celebrate and turn over the keys. This is the first BIE-to-tribal school transition enabled by the Obama Administration’s Blueprint for Reform and the president’s Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) initiative, according to the Department of the Interior.

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/09/23/new-school-new-vision-isleta-pueblo-161840

From Omaha.com, here.  An excerpt:

FLANDREAU, S.D. — At 6 a.m. the dorm’s hallway alarm blared. Then the overhead fluorescent lights beamed on.

Slowly, high school students Talitha Plain Bull, Juwan Grant and Ethan Young Bird tumbled out of bed and toward the showers.

They had arrived the night before, without much time to settle into this government-run boarding school for Native Americans.

Some of their schoolmates had flown to South Dakota from far-flung places like the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Some had come by car. Most had come on buses that traversed the Great Plains, stopping at reservations and towns along the way.