From TurtleTalk: U.S. Presidential Candidates on Native American Issues

In light of campaigning in Indian Country, here are links on how leading candidates are addressing tribes:

Fmr. Sec. Hillary Clinton

“Growing Together: Hillary Clinton’s Vision for Building a Brighter Future for Native Americans” from from her campaign’s webpage.

“How Hillary Clinton’s Campaign Is Making Its Play for Native American Support” from the Atlantic.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT)

“Empowering Tribal Nations” from his campaign’s webpage.

“In Arizona, Sanders woos Native Americans” from the Associated Press and “Bernie Sanders Replaces Stump Speech with Epic Call for Native American Justice in Arizona” from US Uncut.*

*The first article is slightly biased against the Senator but is the AP wire most news outlets reported for the March 17th event.  The second article is biased towards Sanders but includes video of the full speech.

Donald Trump

Trump has no website dedicated to Native issues, but here are some reported positions:

“Donald Trump and Jeb Bush Find Common Ground on Washington’s Football Team” from the NYT reporting on Trump’s defense of the Washington NFL team’s name.

“The Connecticut Roots Of Trump’s First Big Slur” from the Hartford Currant remembering Trump’s testimony to the House Subcommittee on Native Americans in 1993 concerning Tribal casinos.

To read the article on TurtleTalk, click here.

Via TheHill.com: Senate approves No Child Left Behind rewrite, sending legislation to White House

The Senate on Wednesday passed an overhaul of the George W. Bush-era No Child Left Behind law, sending the measure to President Obama’s desk.

Senators approved the conference report worked out by House and Senate negotiators in a 85-12 vote — eight years after the original law expired. The House passed the legislation in an overwhelming vote last week.  The White House said that Obama will sign the legislation Thursday morning.

All 12 votes against the bill came from Republicans, who argued the legislation didn’t go far enough. The “no” votes included Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.), a presidential candidate.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), another presidential candidate, missed the vote but made his opposition clear in a statement.

“In many ways, the conference report was worse than the original Senate bill — removing the few good provisions from the House bill that would have allowed some Title I portability for low-income students as well as a parental opt-out from onerous federal accountability standards,” he said in a statement ahead of the vote. “The American people expect the Republican majority to do better.”

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), also missed the vote, while Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) voted “yes.” Both are running for president.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who is challenging party front-runner Hillary Clinton for the Democratic presidential nomination, missed the vote.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) suggested that passing the legislation after years of failing to agree to a deal is the latest example of how the upper chamber is “working” under a Republican majority.

“Finding a serious replacement for No Child Left Behind eluded Washington for years. Today it will become another bipartisan achievement for our country,” he said. “The new Congress and the new Senate have had a habit this year of turning third rails into bipartisan achievements.”

To read the entire article, click here.