TEDNA sponsored two resolutions that passed at NCAI’s Annual Convention in San Diego last month.  The first was a resolution calling on the Department of Education to utilize its authority under 20 U.S.C. § 1232g(b)(1)(C) and 34 C.F.R. § 99.31(a)(3)(iii) to exempt tribes and TEAs from FERPA’s advance consent requirement by designating TEAs as the Secretary of Education’s authorized representatives.

The second was a resolution that supports the right of American Indian and Alaska Native high school students to practice and express their traditional religious and spiritual beliefs and honor their academic and other achievements by wearing an eagle feather at their commencement ceremonies.

You can see those and all of the other resolutions that passed NCAI’s Annual Convention here.

TEDNA and NARF are proud to distribute two flyers that were created to assist students and families in their quest to wear an eagle feather at their graduation ceremony.  The first trifold flyer is for students and families and serves to provide guidance on working with School Districts to make the request.  The second trifold flyer is an informational flyer for School Districts to inform them about the significance and importance of the eagle feather to graduating students.

An excerpt from the first flyer:

Every year, Native high school students across the country seek to express their individual and tribal religious beliefs and celebrate their personal academic achievements by wearing an eagle feather at their graduation ceremonies. While most public school districts permit Native students to wear eagle feathers at graduation, some school districts do not allow it. This guide provides information for students and families on steps they can take to ensure that the graduate can wear an eagle feather during the commencement ceremony. It is based on approaches we have found most successful in addressing this issue.