With graduation around the corner, this is a good time to remind everyone about the flyers TEDNA and NARF created.  Two flyers were created to assist students and families in their quest to wear an eagle feather at their graduation ceremony.  The first trifold flyer is for students and families and serves to provide guidance on working with School Districts to make the request.  The second trifold flyer is an informational flyer for School Districts to inform them about the significance and importance of the eagle feather to graduating students.

An excerpt from the first flyer:

Every year, Native high school students across the country seek to express their individual and tribal religious beliefs and celebrate their personal academic achievements by wearing an eagle feather at their graduation ceremonies. While most public school districts permit Native students to wear eagle feathers at graduation, some school districts do not allow it. This guide provides information for students and families on steps they can take to ensure that the graduate can wear an eagle feather during the commencement ceremony. It is based on approaches we have found most successful in addressing this issue.

      The Washington State Office of Public Instruction and its Superintendent Randy Dorn recently issued a letter to state schools regarding “tribal students wearing items of cultural significance such as eagle feathers during graduation ceremonies.”  The State concludes that a student wearing an eagle feather “should not be viewed as a violation of the graduation ceremony dress codes.”

To view previous TEDNA articles and links about eagle feathers and graduation this year, click here, here, here, here, here, and here.

NARF, California Indian Legal Services and the ACLU of CA wrote a letter together for the Superintendent of Clovis Unified School District on behalf of Christian Titman.

An excerpt:

One of the proudest moments in my life was graduating with my master’s in education administration from Oglala Lakota College and receiving an eagle feather for achieving a lifelong dream. That was until 2012, when our oldest son graduated from high school, and my wife and I had the honor of tying his eagle feather on him. And we are looking forward to proudly supporting our youngest son when he graduates from high school in 2017.

Eagles are known by many tribes to be a messenger to the Creator, symbolizing bravery, respect, personal achievement and honor. Eagles are protected under two federal laws: the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. These prohibit the possession, use and sale of eagle feathers and parts, with an explicit exception for American Indians who are enrolled members of federally recognized tribes. American Indian tribal members may wear feathers legally in their possession or utilized to create religious or ceremonial items for personal or tribal use.

This month, thousands of American Indian students across the country are graduating from high school and college, fulfilling a dream for themselves and an honor for their families. And with only 49 percent of Native students graduating from high school nationwide, this is a moment to be celebrated and cherished. Honoring our graduating Native students who attend the 187 tribal schools across 23 states has been a longstanding cultural tradition. Native graduates receive their eagle feathers and plumes and proudly wear them on their graduation caps or tied in their hair. This is a part of who we are and continues to affirm our identity and connection to our ancestry and culture.

To read the entire article, click here.

 

FRESNO—Today a Native American graduating senior at Clovis High School filed a notice of intent to file an emergency lawsuit to challenge the school district’s refusal to allow him to wear and display a small eagle feather during the graduation ceremony on Thursday, June 4. The student will only be able to wear the eagle feather, an item with religious and cultural significance, on his graduation cap during the ceremony if a court intervenes. The notice asks for an emergency court hearing on Tuesday, June 2, to decide the issue.

The student, Christian Titman, and his parents have repeatedly asked the school for permission for him to display the eagle feather, presented to him by his father as a mark of his academic achievements, during the upcoming graduation ceremony. However, district officials repeatedly denied their request. Christian, a member of the Pit River Tribe, would like to wear the eagle feather in his graduation cap as an expression of his religious and cultural heritage.

Eagle feathers are sacred to many Native Americans and are a symbol of significant accomplishment. State and federal law protect freedom of expression and recognize the religious significance of eagle feathers for Native Americans. California students also have broad free speech rights under the Education Code.

Other school districts, including in Lemoore and Bishop, have allowed Native American students to wear eagle feathers in their graduation caps as religious expression.

The student is represented by the ACLU of Northern California, California Indian Legal Services, and the Native American Rights Fund. The groups seek an injunction, which would allow Christian to wear and display his eagle feather in his graduation cap.

“Clovis already allows California Scholarship Federation and National Honor Society accessories during the graduation ceremony. It should be no different for Christian to wear a feather as a symbol of his academic accomplishment,” said Novella Coleman, staff attorney with the ACLU of Northern California.

The emergency lawsuit notice comes after the groups sent a letter on May 19 asking the district to reconsider. In a May 22 response, the district lists “acceptable” accessories allowed at graduation and outlines that “students are expected to behave in a manner that respects the formality of the ceremony” and that the ban on accessories is designed to avoid “disruption of the graduation ceremonies.” The district’s formal refusal letter lists other items it bans, such as balloons and noisemakers.

“The district’s refusal to allow a small symbol of religious expression during the graduation ceremony is a misunderstanding of both the spirit and the letter of the law,” said Coleman. “The implication that an eagle feather with religious significance is unacceptable or disruptive signals a deep disrespect from the district.”

The lawsuit will outline protections in the California Constitution for freedom of religious expression and student free speech. A school’s refusal to allow Native American students to wear and display an eagle feather during graduation violates these provisions of the state constitution and the Education Code.

To view the article on the ACLU’s website or further information, click here.