Math Circles Ain’t for Squares: How to Start a Math Circle Students Will Love

Problem-based math circles challenge kids to think for themselves, and are being touted as a way to level the playing field for girls and minorities. Rozhkovskaya’s group, for example, invites guests to discuss how knowing math empowers you to “do incredible things in your life.” Students from the poverty-stricken Navajo Nation agree. Many of the kids who didn’t consider themselves “smart” before joining the local Math Circle have a newfound confidence in their intelligence, thanks to a problem-based approach that challenges them to find their own answers.

While math circles have been making the rounds in Eastern Europe for over a century, they only reached U.S. shores about 20 years ago, Scientific American reports. They’ve expanded quickly; there are currently about 200 chapters nationwide. The gatherings bring like-minded kids who love math together outside of school, where the peer environment may be less than encouraging. The groups usually target middle and high-school students.

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AIGC SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

The All Native American High School Academic Team (ANAHSAT):

  • The AIGC All Native American High School Academic Team (ANAHSAT) honors ten exceptional American Indian and Alaska Native high school students.
  • Students will be evaluated on outstanding original academic, artistic or leadership endeavor, as described in his or her own words.
  • The deadline to apply is March 6, 2015.

The Wells Fargo American Indian Scholarship:

  • Graduate and undergraduate scholarships awarded
  • Applicants must be pursuing a career and degree in fields relating to banking, resort management, gaming operations, management and administration (including accounting, finance, information technology and human resources).
  •  Undergraduate: Must be a college undergraduate junior or senior and must meet the Federal Pell Grant eligibility criteria.
  •  Graduate: Must be a full-time graduate student and have financial need.
  • The deadline to apply is May 15, 2015.

The AIGC Fellowship:

  • Applicants must be pursuing a masters, doctorate or professional degree as a full-time student, at an accredited graduate or professional school in the United States, and be able to demonstrate financial need.
  • The deadline to apply is June 1, 2015.

 BIE – Loan for Service:

  • Graduate level educational loan
  • Awarded to students who possess a minimum 3.0 GPA and are pursing a masters, doctorate or professional degree, as a full-time student at an accredited graduate or professional school in the United States.
  • Loan for Service recipients must agree to relocate, if necessary, to obtain acceptable employment for the service payback agreement.
  • The deadline to apply is June 1, 2015.

 REDW Native American Scholarship in Accounting:

  • Preference for undergraduate applicants; must be a full-time, accounting degree-seeking college undergraduate junior or senior and must meet the Federal Pell Grant eligibility criteria.
  • Graduate students must be full-time, accounting degree-seeking graduate student and have financial need.
  • The deadline to apply is June 1, 2015.

For more information about AIGC scholarships, click here.

Hālau Holomoana – Hawaiian culture/waʻa based maritime vocational training program for H.S. juniors and seniors

Kānehūnāmoku Voyaging Academy’s new project, Hālau Holomoana is accepting applications. The purpose of this project is to pilot a Hawaiian culture/waʻa based maritime vocational training program for high school juniors and seniors. Based on our learning from grand master navigator Mau Piailug and the ʻohana of waʻa, we hope this program will inspire young Hawaiians to enter the maritime industry, to provide them with the skills necessary to enter confidently into 2 and 4 year academies, as well as expose them to the local opportunities in Hawaii’s maritime industry.

Hālau Holomoana is a year long program that begins each fall, consisting of 180 hours of total instruction, culminating in a 10 day open ocean voyage (click here for images of the voyage). Hālau Holomoana having garnered planning input and commitments of support from retired kūpuna who fulfilled successful maritime careers as well as skilled seamanship professionals, cultural practitioners and master navigators, reflects a promising inter-generational, community-based approach. Most importantly, Hālau Holomoana prepares youth for careers that provide a comfortable livelihood while also affording ample time away from work to give back to the community through lifelong learning and perpetuation of Hawaiian canoe culture.

Training will include FA/CPR, water safety, boating and seamanship skills, small boat handling, training on Kānehūnāmoku, coastal and non-instrumental navigation, Hawaiian culture and protocol, with field trips to maritime industry related sites like METC, Hōkūleʻa, Matson Navigation, and Hawaii Tug and Barge.

To learn more about the program or to apply, click here.