Dear Ms. Sarah Butrymowicz of The Hechinger Report,

I’m still waiting for your retraction. It’s been more than three months since you published your deeply flawed article, “Tribal colleges give poor return on more than copy00 million a year in federal money,” and I’m waiting for you to admit to cherry-picking quotes and arriving at sensational conclusions. I thought that by now the published rebuttals of your piece would’ve prompted you to recant your story, but it seems you’re determined to stand by your incomplete analysis. Yet before I write off your journalistic credibility based upon flawed assertions such as “tribal colleges often have abysmal success rates,” I’m compelled to do my part to help you see the error of your ways. The question is: What’s the best way to teach you how to listen?

To read his article, click here.

Here is Indian Country Today’s third article on curbing racism in South Dakota Schools.  An excerpt:

The American Civil Liberties Union states that many schools in border towns have an alarming high arrest rate of young Native students, Rapid City among them. The Winner Public School District overcame the “Pipeline to Prison” model of discipline, but still resists implementing role models and cultural programs.

 

 

Here is ICT’s second article on curbing racism in South Dakota schools.  An excerpt:

In the Rapid City Public Schools, cultural programs and encouraging racial acceptance has been a priority of the school superintendent, Tim Mitchell. However, the school’s alarming rate of arresting students is being questioned by the American Civil Liberties Union.

The first part in this series can be seen here.

Here.  As part of this series,

Indian Country Today Media Network will be examining how discrimination is being addressed in three South Dakota school districts.

Racism is most tragic when it affects children, and for many years, the schools in South Dakota were noted for problems. At least three school districts in South Dakota, including Rapid City, Winner, and Sisseton, are exploring ways to counter discrimination.