The 10thannual Lakota Summer Institute will be held June 6 to 24 at Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, North Dakota.

“For me, this was a spiritual journey which I will never forget,” Rick Williams, a 2015 LSI participant, told the Tribal College Journal.

Hundreds of Lakota learners and educators have attended LSI in the past.

Alli Moran is a three-year LSI attendant who practices Lakota at home. “When I was 10 everything began to come together. I began to understand what it means being a Native woman and the importance of Lakota language and culture… I love it here. I love seeing everyone come together and we all have a common cause, which is to learn and speak the language.”

For more information, click the links below:

Read what other past participants have to say here.

Registration is free and open now at LakSummerInst.com.

Isleta Pueblo has taken over the Isleta Elementary School, which since its founding in the 1890s had been under the control of the federal government. The difference in school morale and the children’s behavior, say school officials, is already evident. And it was certainly easy to see the day ICTMN visited—bubbly, friendly, well-behaved children, smiling teachers only too eager to show off their classrooms, and committed staff who took time to share their programs and plans for the future.

The transfer was official July 1. Just a few days before school started in August Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn, Bureau of Indian Education Director Charles Roessel and Sen. Martin Heinrich, D-N.M, joined Isleta Pueblo Gov. E. Paul Torres at the school to celebrate and turn over the keys. This is the first BIE-to-tribal school transition enabled by the Obama Administration’s Blueprint for Reform and the president’s Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) initiative, according to the Department of the Interior.

Torres explained that this is the school his grandmas and grandpas attended. It had once been an important gathering place for the community and provided a sense of continuity.

The language program has been active in the school for about two and a half years, with David Lente, Isleta Pueblo, serving as language teacher for grades K-6. “We’re incubating the language program now, working up to integrating language/culture into all instruction at the school,” he said. Among the initiatives underway, explained Lujan, are the production of cartoons in Tiwa for the younger kids and working with a private contractor to develop a Tiwa language program to run on Apple devices, called Tiwa Talk.

“Language, culture, and tradition are the focus of our new school,” said Gov. Torres. “We need our future leaders to be strong in language and culture to keep our identity.”

Here is an article on an ANA grant for language preservation.

Young children in the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa tribe will soon have more opportunities to learn their native Ojibwe tongue from tribal elders as part of a language preservation grant from HHS’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF).

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The grant allows the Red Cliff Early Childhood Center Head Start Program to hire a language instructor and assistant to work with children in their three Head Start classrooms. In addition, they will work with the Bayfield School District as they plan an Ojibwe Language Immersion Charter School for fall 2015.