NARF Legal Review Covers Boarding School History and the Path to Healing

Here. An excerpt:

Like a lot of the details of the United States historical relations with the indigenous inhabitants of this land, the story of the Indian boarding school policy of the United States government has largely been written out of the history books. Yet, this was a major federal policy. And it had major impacts, positive and negative, on indigenous individuals, families, and communities. These impacts are still felt to this day. In retrospect, the policy was based on flawed thinking – despite the fact that it was clothed in at least the appearance of good intention. The flawed basis of the policy was that the all-out elimination of what is uniquely “Native,” and full-scale assimilation into the dominant society of the United States, was required in order to ensure the survival of individuals of Native descent. The policy was, at its core, a policy of cultural genocide.

Oklahoma SCT Decides Case in Favor of Indian Football Players at Sequoyah High School in Talequah

Here is the opinion in Scott v. Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Assn.:

2013-10-01 OSSAA Opinion

A summary of the case by Chad Smith, who represented the players:

The OSSAA suspended 12 students at Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah and did not let compete in the state football championships.  Sequoyah is an Indian boarding school run by the Cherokee Nation.  The Oklahoma Supreme Court found the OSSAA was arbitrary and capacious and reversed the District Court.

Thanks to Turtletalk for this update.