sacred_places2015

From NARF:

For our friends in the Colorado region, please join us this Friday, June 19, for a sunrise ceremony that will be held at 7:00 a.m. on the front lawn of the Native American Rights Fund at 1506 Broadway in Boulder, Colorado.

The program and prayer service will last about one hour, followed by a potluck breakfast. Speakers will include Kiowa elder, Andy Cozad, and NARF attorneys involved in sacred places work.  Speakers will be followed by a moment of silence in honor of the many sacred places that are being threatened, damaged, and destroyed today.

On Tuesday evening, House and Senate appropriators released the FY 2015 Omnibus Appropriations bill (HR 83), which will fund TEAs through Department  of Interior for the first time.

Here is the BIA section of the Interior explanatory statement. On page 24, it provides that:

Education.- The agreement includes $2,000,000 for the development and operation of tribal departments or divisions of education as authorized in 25 U.S.C. 2020.

This funding through the Department of Interior has been authorized since 1988 (see NARF Orange Book at 5), but Congress has never appropriated the money. TEDNA and its partner organizations, NIEA and NCAI, have long advocated for fulfillment of this promise. The bill, which is expected to be passed by both the House and Senate later this week, will mean new capacity-building grant opportunities for TEAs, which will expand tribal involvement in Indian education.  The STEP Program, which TEDNA long advocated for and was also a first of its kind, is a similar appropriation through the Department of Education.

You can see Quinton Roman Nose’s Testimony to the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies for FY 2015 here, and for FY 2014 here.  You can also see other budget requests in our Congressional Materials section.  We will provide more information as it becomes available.

Here. An excerpt:

Like a lot of the details of the United States historical relations with the indigenous inhabitants of this land, the story of the Indian boarding school policy of the United States government has largely been written out of the history books. Yet, this was a major federal policy. And it had major impacts, positive and negative, on indigenous individuals, families, and communities. These impacts are still felt to this day. In retrospect, the policy was based on flawed thinking – despite the fact that it was clothed in at least the appearance of good intention. The flawed basis of the policy was that the all-out elimination of what is uniquely “Native,” and full-scale assimilation into the dominant society of the United States, was required in order to ensure the survival of individuals of Native descent. The policy was, at its core, a policy of cultural genocide.

2013 Decision Making Guide

This Guide was developed in collaboration with the National Congress of American Indians through a grant provided by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  One of the key purposes of the Grant was to help strengthen the role of tribal governments in Native education.  This Guide is intended to help accomplish that goal by providing Tribes and TEAs with an outline of select K-12 federal programs in which TEAs can potentially participate and thereby provide options for TEAs to enhance their role in Native education.The Guide focuses on select programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (“ESEA”) as well as other federal laws.