The Office of Indian Education announces on Monday, February 29, 2016 the availability of the 2016 Native Youth Community Projects applicaton. The announcement published today, February 29, 2016 and will close May 31, 2016. The 2016 competition is the second year under the Native Youth Community Projects priority under the demonstration program. In 2015 twelve applications were funded for a period up to four years. For 2016, however, there will be additional funding for additional projects to be funded, expanding even further, the college and career ready capability of local tribal communities.

The Notice Inviting Application was published in the Federal Register on February 29, 2016 and is available at this link: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-02-29/pdf/2016-04260.pdf.

For more information you may check the Demonstration Grant program page here: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/indiandemo/applicant.html.

A new press releases was issued on Monday, Feb 29 regarding the Native Youth Community Projects competition for 2016. You may find the press release at this link: http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/historic-investment-174-million-grants-available-help-native-youth
. (February 29, 2016)

The Office of Indian Education will host a series of online webinar sessions for the 2016 NYCP competition. The first webinar is scheduled for March 9, 2016 and titled Native Youth Community Projects Pre-Application Webinar Session. You are invited to participate in a webinar event sponsored and presented by the U. S. Department of Education, Office of Indian Education, and coordinated by The Millennium Group International (TMG) Technical Assistance Team.

This webinar will be the first in a series of five webinar presentations designed to support you through the Native Youth Community Project (NYCP) 2016 application process. It is designed to present an overview of the NYCP grant competition and effective, practical, and realistic strategies on the grant application process. This 90 minute webinar will focus on understanding the NYCP application and will be presented on March 9, 2016 at 2:00 PM EST. The webinar aims to build knowledge of applying for federal grants, highlight federal grant resources, address applicant concerns, and increase participants’ feelings of efficacy around federal grant application submission.

Registration for the Webinar is now open and will remain open until 1:00 PM EST on March 9, 2016.

To register, please visit: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7716231139655152132. GoToWebinar is an on-line registration service and will provide immediate confirmation upon registration.

Webinar Topic: Telling Your Story: Understanding the NYCP Application & What It Can Do for Your Community
Date: March 9, 2016
Time: 2:00 PM EST

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                                               Feb. 29,2016
Contact: Press Office
(202) 401-1576 or press@ed.gov

Support Aimed at Helping Native Students Become College-, Career-Ready

The U.S. Department of Education today announced it is more than tripling – from $5.3 million to $17.4 million – the availability of funding for grants to help Native American youth become college- and career-ready.

The extra support is being provided for Native Youth Community Projects (NYCP) as an ongoing step toward implementing President Obama’s commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaskan Native children. The grants will support the President’s Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative to help Native American youth.

 In a Federal Register notice, the Department said it expects to make approximately 19 demonstration awards ranging from $500,000 to $1 million to tribal communities before Sept. 30.

 “In too many places across Indian Country, Native youth do not receive adequate resources to help prepare them for success in school or after graduation,” said Acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr.  “The Native Youth Community Projects are an investment in bringing tribal communities together to change that reality, and dramatically transform the opportunities for Native youth.  When tribal communities join together around shared goals for Native youth, we will see locally driven solutions coming from leaders who work most closely with students and are best-positioned to lead change.”

William Mendoza, executive director of the White House Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, said, “These resources are desperately needed in tribal communities and are rooted in the value of tribally driven partnerships and strategies as a foundation to addressing the challenges Native youth face.”

 Today’s announcement builds on the NYCP grants awarded last year to a dozen recipients in nine states that impacted over 30 tribes and involved more than 48 schools. The NYCP program is based on significant consultation with tribal communities and recognizes that these communities can best:

·         Identify key barriers to and opportunities for improving educational and life outcomes for Native youth, and

·         Develop and implement locally produced strategies designed to address those barriers.

Each grant will support a coordinated, focused approach chosen by a community partnership that includes a tribe, local schools and other optional service providers or organizations.

 For example, the program allows tribes to identify ways to achieve college and career readiness specific to their own populations – which could include any number of approaches, such as early learning, language immersion or mental health services. Communities can tailor strategies to address barriers to success for students in college-and-career readiness.  The success of these projects will guide the work of future practices that improve the educational opportunities and achievement of preschool, elementary and secondary Indian students.

 The President’s recent fiscal year 2017 budget proposal calls for increased investments across Indian Country.  The plan would:

 ·         Significantly expand the overall funding for NYCP to $53 million.

·         Provide $350 million for Preschool Development Grants – an increase of $100 million over fiscal year 2016 – to help develop and expand high-quality preschool programs in targeted communities, including planning grants to tribal governments.

·         Help nearly 470,000 Native students with increased support for Title I programs serving low-income schools with funding necessary to provide high-need students access to an excellent education.  The proposal seeks $15.4 billion – a $450 million increase – for all Title I efforts.

 In addition, Acting Secretary King will be visiting the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota in the coming months to listen to the needs of tribal officials and share information on the efforts by the Administration to help Native youth and adults.

 For more on the Administration’s investment in Native American issues, visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/nativeamericans.

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the availability of an estimated $3 million in grants to help Native American youth become college- and career-ready. Funding for the new Native Youth Community Projects is a key step toward implementing President Obama’s commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaskan Native children. The new grants will support the President’s Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative launched last year to help Native American youth.

“We know that tribes are in the best position to determine the needs and barriers that Native youth face,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “The Native Youth Community Projects will allow tribal communities to come together to improve outcomes for students.”

In a Federal Register notice, the Department said it would award five to seven demonstration grants ranging from $400,000 to $600,000 to tribal communities before Sept. 30. The new program is based on significant consultation with tribal communities and recognizes that these communities are best-positioned to:

  • Identify key barriers to improving educational and life outcomes for Native youth, and
  • Develop and implement locally produced strategies designed to address those barriers.

Each grant will support a coordinated, focused approach chosen by a community partnership that includes a tribe, local schools and other optional service providers or organizations. For example, the program allows tribes to identify ways to achieve college and career readiness specific to their own communities – whether it’s early learning, language immersion or mental health services. Communities can tailor actions to address one or more of those issues. The success of these first projects will guide the work of future practices that improve the educational opportunities and achievement of preschool, elementary and secondary Indian students.

The President’s FY 2016 budget proposal calls for increased investments across Indian Country, including a total request of $20.8 billion for a range of federal programs that serve tribes – a $1.5 billion increase over the 2015-enacted level. The budget proposal includes $53 million for fiscal year 2016 – a $50 million increase from this year – to significantly expand the Native Youth Community Projects program.

For more on the Administration’s investment in Native American issues, visit https://www.whitehouse.gov/nativeamericans.

The Department of Education (ED) invites stakeholders to provide comments on proposed priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the Indian Demonstration and Indian Professional Development programs. Last week, ED published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for the Professional Development program and the Demonstration Grants for Indian Children (Demonstration Grants program). Both grant programs are authorized under Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). For the Professional Development program, the regulations would enhance the project design and quality of services to better meet the objectives of the program; establish post-award requirements; and govern the payback process for grants in existence of the date these regulations become effective. For the Demonstration Grants program, ED is proposing new priorities, including one for the newly-announced Native Youth Community Projects, and application requirements.

Submission Information:
• Federal Register Notice
• Submission Deadline: January 2, 2015
• Electronic Submissions: Please visit http://www.regulations.gov
Or Mail to:

John Cheek
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Room 3W207
Washington, D.C. 20202-6135
(202) 401-0274

For more information, please contact John Cheek at the U.S. Department of Education at (202) 401-0274 or john.cheek@ed.gov.