Here.  An excerpt:

SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

  • Must be majoring in a business related field
  • Must be a junior, senior or graduate student
  • Must be enrolled as a full-time student
  • Must be enrolled at an accredited post-secondary institution of higher education
  • If selected, candidate must be able to attend the NCAIED Scholarship Awards Luncheon

(Expenses including lodging, ground transportation and airfare within the U.S. will be provided by NCAIED)
*Important: If selected a candidate is unable to attend, award will be forfeited.

Montana educators working in high-needs communities who are seeking an early childhood education master’s degree or endorsement for teaching preschool through 3rd grade are eligible to apply for a full tuition scholarship to attend a Montana college or university, Governor Steve Bullock and Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau announced.

“This scholarship opportunity means more Montana teachers will have access to furthering their careers, at the same time the state builds its capacity to provide a quality education to young children,” Juneau said.

Montana is one of just eight states that doesn’t offer public preschool to all children. The 2015 Legislature didn’t provide funding to create an early education program, but Montana applied for and received a preschool development grant to expand access to learning programs in targeted high-needs communities. That $10 million-per-year grant will support programs this fall in places like Great Falls, Anaconda, Browning and Lewistown. The grant funding also pays the tuition for educators seeking the specialized preschool-3rd grade, or P-3 endorsement.

The grant is a collaboration among the Governor’s Office, Office of Public instruction and Department of Public Health and Human Services.

“Through these scholarships, we will grow and strengthen our early childhood workforce, ensuring that more young learners in Montana — particularly those in at-risk communities — will have the benefit of high-quality educators,” Bullock noted. “This is an incredible opportunity for individuals who are looking to further their education and for the children and families who will ultimately be served by great teachers in high-quality preschool programs.”

The Montana Early Childhood Project at Montana State University is administering the scholarships. The competitive application process is open to educators currently working at least 15 hours per week in a classroom setting, those who are current on the Montana Early Care and Education Practitioner Registry, and educators who have a minimum 2.5 GPA for previous coursework. Priority will be given to individuals teaching in the grant-targeted programs and communities.

“Research consistently shows children who attend a quality preschool program are more likely to graduate from high school, achieve higher academic success, and are more likely to succeed in their careers,” Juneau said. “It’s great that Montana teachers will now have the opportunity to receive the training required to begin building a preschool program that’s accessible to more families.”

Earlier this month, the Montana Board of Public Education approved the new P-3 endorsement opportunity available at some state colleges.

Click here for a full list of eligibility requirements and click here to apply. The deadline to apply is Aug. 14.

For more information, visit the Office of Public Instruction’s website, here.

TEDNA is proud to present our first  Merit Award Essay Contest. We invite Native American incoming college freshman and undergraduate students whose tribe is a member of TEDNA to submit an essay by August 24, 2015.  This year’s theme is “The Importance of Culture in Education”. Three awards will be given in the amount of: $500, $300 and $200, respectively.

The requirements are here. For more information, view our flyer here.

To become a member of TEDNA, click here.

If you have any questions, call (303) 447-8760 or email zephier@narf.org

Here. An excerpt:

We are happy to announce the opening of the Cobell Scholars Program scholarship application. The American Indian Graduate Center will manage the Cobell Scholars Program which was established as a result of the Cobell v. Salazarlitigation.  The Cobell Scholars Program is intended to provide financial assistance in the form of scholarships to American Indian and Alaska Native students to defray the cost of attendance at both post-secondary vocational schools and institutions of higher education, including graduate and professional schools.

ELIGIBILITY: Scholarships in various amounts are awarded to U.S. Federally-recognized American Indian and Alaska Native community members (students) who are vocational certificate-seeking or associate, bachelor, graduate and professional degree-seeking students in full-time, accredited, non-profit institutions in the United States; and who are able to demonstrate financial need through the submission of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

A complete application will consist of:

  1. A completed General Application (deadline June 1); and,
  2. Completion of Cobell Scholars opportunity-specific questions (deadline June 1); and,
  3. Tribal Eligibility Certificate (due July 15) which is also available at aigcs.org in the Scholarships section titledOnline Application Instructions; and,
  4. Financial Needs Form(due July 15) which is also available at aigcs.org in the Scholarships section titled Online Application Instructions.

All eligible students are highly encouraged to complete the Cobell Scholars application for funding consideration. Take time to peruse the online application system as you may be eligible for other opportunities.

For more information and to apply, please visit aigcs.org, review the instructions and qualifications, then select “Apply/Check Status” on the right hand side of the page.

H/t to Turtle Talk.

Scholarship Created In Memory of Evelyn Stevenson

Evelyn Stevenson touched many lives throughout her lifetime.  She will be greatly missed, not only in Indian country but throughout the world.  Fortunately, her strong and passionate advocacy for Indian people and tribal sovereignty will continue to ripple forward through those she mentored, mothered and assisted in a multitude of ways.  Evelyn’s obituary paints a vivid picture of her generosity, dedication, determination, diverse interests and sense of humor.  As noted by her son Craig Stevenson, Evelyn was a strong supporter of education in the broadest sense possible.  Building on Evelyn’s recognition that education can be a powerful tool for protecting, preserving and promoting the vast array of components associated with tribal sovereignty, a scholarship has been established in her memory at the Salish Kootenai College.  Individuals wishing to honor Evelyn Stevenson by donating to this scholarship should contact the SKC Foundation online, by phone at 406-275-4983 or by mail at P.O. Box 70, Pablo, MT  59855.

The Young Native Writers Essay Contest is a writing contest for Native American high school students and is designed to encourage young Native Americans to write about their experiences as a member of a Native American community and the culture that inspires them.

The voices that emerge from this program honor the legacy of every Native American who has ever lived. Add your words to the thousands submitted through this project – all writers receive a Certificate of Honor for their submission.

The Holland & Knight Charitable Foundation’s goal of promoting education and creating new opportunities for youth has inspired this essay contest. Partnering with Holland & Knight in this endeavor are the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Indian Education Association.

Click here for more information.