An excerpt:

Just as the feds have long predicted, the 50 million-plus students enrolled in the country’s public K-12 schools this fall are more racially diverse than ever. Students of color now outnumber their white peers, largely thanks to striking growth in America’s Latino and Asian youth populations. Times sure have changed: Fewer than one in five Americans ages 85 or older was a minority in 2013, versus half of children under 5.

Taken as a whole, these statistics suggest that it may be time to revisit the word “minorities” when talking about students who aren’t white. Then again, the statistics probably shouldn’t be taken as a whole.

A close analysis of the U.S. Department of Education’s actual and projected demographic data suggests that the trends for students identified as “American Indian” or “Alaska Native” tend to deviate from the overall student body. These discrepancies are often so subtle that they seem negligible; the data is so tenuous that the subject seems moot. But these nuances are important to highlight—if only because America’s indigenous children are so often left out of conversations about closing the “achievement gap.”

To read the entire article, click here.

The Department of Education announces their intention to establish a negotiated rulemaking committee prior to publishing proposed regulations to implement part A of title I, Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies, of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). The negotiating committee will include representatives of constituencies that are significantly affected by the topics proposed for negotiations, including Federal, State, and local education administrators, tribal leadership, parents and students, including historically underrepresented students, teachers, principals, other school leaders (including charter school leaders), paraprofessionals, members of State and local boards of education, the civil rights community, including representatives of students with disabilities, English learners, and other historically under-served students, and the business community.

DATES: Must be received on or before February 25, 2016

Submit your nominations for negotiators to:
James Butler, U.S.
Department of Education, 400 Maryland
Avenue SW., Room 3W246,
Washington, DC 20202

Telephone (202) 260–9737
or by email:OESE.ESSA.nominations@ed.gov.

For more information, click here.

Two Opportunities to join the U.S. Department Education Tribal Consultation; FY16 priorities for grants under the Native American and Alaska Native Children in Schools Program (NAM)

Date: Tuesday, January 12, 2016
Time:2:00 PM to 4:00 PM EST
Duration: 2hours

To join the webinar, please follow the corresponding steps:

1.To access audio dial the following number:
888-324-9648
2.When prompted for the participant pass code enter:
2753089
3.You are encouraged to join the online meeting as well by using this link here.
4.When prompted for a meeting number enter:
745 749390
5.Then enter the following password:
011216

Date: Wednesday, January 13, 2016
Time: 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM EST
Duration: 2 hours

To join the webinar, please follow the corresponding steps:

1. To access audio dial this toll free number:
888-324-9648
2. When prompted for the participant pass code enter:
2753089
3. You are encouraged to join the meeting online as well by using this link here.
4. When prompted for a meeting number enter:
745 142 941.
5. Then enter the following password:
011316

 For more information, click here.

An excerpt:

The struggle to protect students’ privacy while making use of the data collected on them in school has for years been focused on the role of outside companies.

But while that debate has raged in Congress and statehouses across the country, K-12 school systems in more than a dozen cities and counties have quietly begun linking children’s educational records with data from other government agencies, covering everything from children’s mental-health status to their history of child-welfare placements and their involvement in the juvenile-justice system.

Proponents say that such intergovernmental “integrated data systems” can yield powerful insights that promote a more holistic understanding of children’s experiences. They point to an emerging track record of the information being used to improve policy, service delivery, and program evaluation.

Take, for example, Allegheny County, in southwestern Pennsylvania. After learning that 14,450 Pittsburgh public school students—more than half the district—had been involved in county human-services programs, officials there have worked to analyze the experiences of homeless students and children in foster care. They’ve initiated a new cross-sector effort to combat chronic absenteeism. Child-welfare caseworkers will soon receive weekly email alerts when children in their caseloads get suspended or miss multiple days of school. And district officials or school counselors and social workers could get similar notices when one of their students shows up in a homeless shelter, runs afoul of the law, or is moved from his or her child-welfare placement.

“It’s been transformational in understanding how a community, school districts, and other child-serving government agencies can come together to support kids,” said Erin Dalton, the deputy director of the county’s human-services department’s data-analysis, research, and evaluation office.

The administration of President Barack Obama and the U.S. Department of Education are both part of a growing national push for those kinds of data-sharing arrangements. But clearing the legal and technical hurdles to create such systems is difficult.

Turning the resulting data into better policies and fresh practices is even harder.

And the privacy concerns associated with integrated data systems—including potential breaches, the creation of inaccurate or misleading profiles, and possible stigmatization of children—are immense.

To read the entire article, click here.

The Office of Indian Education will host two separate informational webinars next week on the new Native Youth Community Projects grant initiative. These webinars will discuss developing community partnerships and needs assessment and data analysis.

 NYCP: Developing Community Partnerships   REGISTER HERE

Tuesday, May 19, 2015 from 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. EDT  

 The goal of the webinar is to enable potential NYCP grant applicants to identify and select partners that compliment community effort to address priorities. The webinar will focus on the need for creating community partnerships that focus on identified areas (both content and geographic location). Participants will also develop an understanding of the steps to creating a successful partnership (roles of partners, and collaboration vs. cooperation) and how to finalize and sustain partnerships.

  NYCP: Needs Assessment and Data Analysis   REGISTER HERE

Thursday, May 21, 2015, from 2:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. EDT

 The goal of this webinar is to assist potential grant applicants to identify, collect, and assess data related to their tribe’s educational needs. This includes identifying opportunities and barriers to reaching college-and-career ready youth, using data and the needs assessment to develop a project, determining feasibility to address top community needs and developing community partnership priority(s) that are addressed in the application.

To learn more about STEP visit: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/step/applicant.html
To learn more about NYCP visit: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/oie/index.html