The 2016 Young Native Writers Essay Contest is open to Native American high school students currently enrolled in grades 9-12only. All students participating in the Young Native Writers Essay Contest should have a significant and current relationship with a Native American community (i.e., an American Indian tribe, an Alaska Native community or a Native Hawaiian community).

2016 Prompt Native Youth Initiatives
What active role should Native youth take in advancing Native initiatives within your community, region, or state? The essay should use research from your tribal community (website, tribal documents or personal interviews) and should reflect on your own experiences within their community.

Prizes

The following prizes will be awarded to winning essayists:

Four (4) First-Place Winners will each receive an expense-paid trip to Washington, D.C., to visit the National Museum of the American Indian and other prominent sites as part of Scholar Week (July 24 – 28, 2016).

First-Place Winners will receive a special award for display at home or school. In addition, each First-Place Winner will receive a scholarship of $2,500 to be paid directly to the college or university of his or her choice.

Entry Deadline for the 2016 Young Native Writers Essay is Wednesday, April 30, 2016.

For more information, click here.

Under the new Native Youth Community Projects (NYCP) program, the Department is making grants to a dozen recipients in nine states that will impact more than thirty tribes and involve more than 48 schools. These awards are a demonstration of President Obama’s strong commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaska Native children and a key element of his Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative to help Native American youth.

TEDNA was one of the grantees.

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Joyce Silverthorne, Director of Office of Indian Education, Gloria Sly, TEDNA President, Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education , Quinton RomanNose, TEDNA

On Tuesday evening, House and Senate appropriators released the FY 2015 Omnibus Appropriations bill (HR 83), which will fund TEAs through Department  of Interior for the first time.

Here is the BIA section of the Interior explanatory statement. On page 24, it provides that:

Education.- The agreement includes $2,000,000 for the development and operation of tribal departments or divisions of education as authorized in 25 U.S.C. 2020.

This funding through the Department of Interior has been authorized since 1988 (see NARF Orange Book at 5), but Congress has never appropriated the money. TEDNA and its partner organizations, NIEA and NCAI, have long advocated for fulfillment of this promise. The bill, which is expected to be passed by both the House and Senate later this week, will mean new capacity-building grant opportunities for TEAs, which will expand tribal involvement in Indian education.  The STEP Program, which TEDNA long advocated for and was also a first of its kind, is a similar appropriation through the Department of Education.

You can see Quinton Roman Nose’s Testimony to the House Committee on Appropriations, Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies for FY 2015 here, and for FY 2014 here.  You can also see other budget requests in our Congressional Materials section.  We will provide more information as it becomes available.

The Department of Education (ED) invites stakeholders to provide comments on proposed priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the Indian Demonstration and Indian Professional Development programs. Last week, ED published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for the Professional Development program and the Demonstration Grants for Indian Children (Demonstration Grants program). Both grant programs are authorized under Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). For the Professional Development program, the regulations would enhance the project design and quality of services to better meet the objectives of the program; establish post-award requirements; and govern the payback process for grants in existence of the date these regulations become effective. For the Demonstration Grants program, ED is proposing new priorities, including one for the newly-announced Native Youth Community Projects, and application requirements.

Submission Information:
• Federal Register Notice
• Submission Deadline: January 2, 2015
• Electronic Submissions: Please visit http://www.regulations.gov
Or Mail to:

John Cheek
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Room 3W207
Washington, D.C. 20202-6135
(202) 401-0274

For more information, please contact John Cheek at the U.S. Department of Education at (202) 401-0274 or john.cheek@ed.gov.

The Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education proposes priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the State Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) program. The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2015 and later years. We propose this action to enable tribal educational agencies (TEAs) to administer formula grant programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), and to improve the partnership between TEAs and the State educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs) that educate students from the affected tribe.

Comments are due by December 1, 2014

Follow the link here for further information or contact Shahla Ortega, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., room 3E211, Washington, DC 20202-6450. Telephone: (202) 453-5602 or by email: shahla.ortega@ed.gov.

Webinar Series – BIE Blueprint for Reform: Understanding the Implementation, Part II

 Due to consistent demand from our membership for more information, NIEA will hold our second Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) informational webinar tomorrow on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 at 4:00 pm (eastern). For those who missed the initial session, we are providing this opportunity for additional dialogue and new information so our stakeholders can decide the best pathways for local schools and communities. Registration is open NOW, so if you are an educator, parent, tribal leader, or stakeholder who is curious for what this reform means for your student, school, or community, this is the perfect opportunity to get more information.

 Facilitators

  • Dr. Charles “Monty” Roessel, BIE Director
  • Ahniwake Rose, NIEA Executive Director

Important Information

  • Date: TODAY – Tuesday, September 16, 2014
  • Time: 4:00 pm (eastern)
  • Registration: Please click HERE.
  • Additional Details: Please visit www.niea.org.

Material for the Event 

For more information or questions, please contact Clint J. Bowers, NIEA Policy Associate, at cbowers@niea.org.