Here from Native News Online.net.  An excerpt from the article:

TAHLEQUAH, OKLAHOMA— The Cherokee Immersion Charter School graduated its third group of Cherokee speakers Tuesday.

The school, which is operated by the Cherokee Nation, held its sixth-grade graduation Tuesday night in the Sequoyah High School gym.

The graduating students have been taught the importance of preserving the Cherokee language as part of their cultural identity. Students speak only Cherokee while they learn grade level state standard curriculum and also learn to read and write the 86-character Cherokee syllabary.

“We’re making history every day with these children, since there are very few programs out there we can compare to in terms of bilingual education and preservation of a native language,” Cherokee Immersion Charter School Principal Holly Davis said. “These students are doing something very unique so that our next generation will carry on our tradition and language.”

An inspirational article about how the Yurok Tribe is preserving their language throughout Northern California.

An excerpt:

The Yurok Tribe’s extensive campaign to revive the language serves as a model to the many other tribes, some rich with gambling revenues, that are undertaking similar efforts, experts say. No other Native American language is believed to be taught in as many public schools in California as Yurok, a fact that serves to widen the circle of speakers and perhaps to secure the next generation of teachers.

The experience of the Yuroks and other tribes is also redefining what it means to have a living language. A generation ago, linguists predicted that Yurok and many other Native American languages would become extinct around this time with the deaths of tribal members who grew up speaking the languages, the criterion used at the time…

You can read the complete article here!

An excerpt from KTOO.org:

Supporters of a bill to make 20 Alaska Native languages official state languages organized a 15 hour sit-in protest at the Capitol on Sunday. Their dedication paid off early this morning, when the measure passed the Alaska Senate on an 18-2 vote.
House Bill 216 passed the Alaska House of Representatives last week, 38-0.
It now heads to Governor Sean Parnell for his signature.


Click here to read the full article.

Here, from Alaska Public Media. An excerpt:

The House State Affairs Committee on Tuesday unanimously passed House Bill 216 from Rep. Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins, D-Sitka, less than a week after some Republicans on the panel raised concerns about the bill’s potential ramifications.

Tlingit elder Selina Everson teared up during public testimony.

“Our language is our very being. It’s our culture,” Everson said. “We were brought up with such respect to each other, to the Tlingit people, the Haida people, the Tsimshian people, the Yup’ik, the whole state of Alaska with all the different languages being spoken. It would be an honor to be recognized.”