Dreamstarter Grant Year 2: Arts and Culture

Over 5 years,Running Strong will provide fifty $10,000 grants to American Indian youth to help make their dreams a reality. Working with a non-profit organization that will act as their mentor,each Dreamstarter will have the opportunity to create and manage community-Level projects based on their dream. Ten Dreamstarter projects will be chosen each year with particular focus on that year’s theme:

Year 1 2015: Wellness
Year 2 2016:Arts & Culture
Year 3 2017: Education
Year 4 2018: Science ft The Environment
Year 5 2019: Any of the above

Every Dreamstarter and her or his mentor organization will be sent to an all expenses paid, four-day training workshop hosted in Washington, DC by Running Strong. In addition to learning invaluable skills for making their dream become reality, grant recipients will have the opportunity to meet Olympic Gold Medalist and Running Strong
Spokesperson Billy Mil ls and other prominent Native American figures in Washington,D.C.

To apply for this grant, each eligible Dreamstarter must:
– Be under 30 years old
– Be an enrolled member of a current or terminated federal/ state Indian Nation
– Identify and apply with a qualifying 501(c)3 or 7871 non-profit serving one or
more American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian community

For more information, click here.

NCAIED AMERICAN INDIAN BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM – Deadline October 16

Here.  An excerpt:

SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

  • Must be majoring in a business related field
  • Must be a junior, senior or graduate student
  • Must be enrolled as a full-time student
  • Must be enrolled at an accredited post-secondary institution of higher education
  • If selected, candidate must be able to attend the NCAIED Scholarship Awards Luncheon

(Expenses including lodging, ground transportation and airfare within the U.S. will be provided by NCAIED)
*Important: If selected a candidate is unable to attend, award will be forfeited.

Immediate Release: N7 Fund to Provide Funding for Native Youth-Led Sports Programs

From CNAY blog here. An excerpt:

Washington, DC, July 20, 2015 –– As a part of President Obama’s Generation Indigenous (Gen-I) initiative, Nike, Inc. and the N7 Fund has partnered with the Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) to extend grant opportunities as a resource for Native youth leaders promoting health and wellness through sport and physical activity in their community. Gen-I is an initiative to help improve the lives of Native youth and to cultivate the next generation of Native leaders. Gen-I includes new investments and policies to expand educational, employment, and health and social services for Native youth. CNAY, along with the Department of the Interior, have partnered to launch a National Native Youth Network. Through this Network, CNAY has engaged over 2,000 Native youth from across the country in 2015.

. . . .

Native youth can now apply for up to $10,000 in funding for their programs and initiatives through the N7 Fund website. For more information and to apply, please visit http://n7fund.com/apply/.

Via Montana Office of Public Instruction: Gov. Bullock and Superintendent Juneau Announce Scholarship Availability For Educators Seeking Preschool Teaching Endorsement

Montana educators working in high-needs communities who are seeking an early childhood education master’s degree or endorsement for teaching preschool through 3rd grade are eligible to apply for a full tuition scholarship to attend a Montana college or university, Governor Steve Bullock and Superintendent of Public Instruction Denise Juneau announced.

“This scholarship opportunity means more Montana teachers will have access to furthering their careers, at the same time the state builds its capacity to provide a quality education to young children,” Juneau said.

Montana is one of just eight states that doesn’t offer public preschool to all children. The 2015 Legislature didn’t provide funding to create an early education program, but Montana applied for and received a preschool development grant to expand access to learning programs in targeted high-needs communities. That $10 million-per-year grant will support programs this fall in places like Great Falls, Anaconda, Browning and Lewistown. The grant funding also pays the tuition for educators seeking the specialized preschool-3rd grade, or P-3 endorsement.

The grant is a collaboration among the Governor’s Office, Office of Public instruction and Department of Public Health and Human Services.

“Through these scholarships, we will grow and strengthen our early childhood workforce, ensuring that more young learners in Montana — particularly those in at-risk communities — will have the benefit of high-quality educators,” Bullock noted. “This is an incredible opportunity for individuals who are looking to further their education and for the children and families who will ultimately be served by great teachers in high-quality preschool programs.”

The Montana Early Childhood Project at Montana State University is administering the scholarships. The competitive application process is open to educators currently working at least 15 hours per week in a classroom setting, those who are current on the Montana Early Care and Education Practitioner Registry, and educators who have a minimum 2.5 GPA for previous coursework. Priority will be given to individuals teaching in the grant-targeted programs and communities.

“Research consistently shows children who attend a quality preschool program are more likely to graduate from high school, achieve higher academic success, and are more likely to succeed in their careers,” Juneau said. “It’s great that Montana teachers will now have the opportunity to receive the training required to begin building a preschool program that’s accessible to more families.”

Earlier this month, the Montana Board of Public Education approved the new P-3 endorsement opportunity available at some state colleges.

Click here for a full list of eligibility requirements and click here to apply. The deadline to apply is Aug. 14.

For more information, visit the Office of Public Instruction’s website, here.

TEDNA Presents A Merit Award Essay Contest

TEDNA is proud to present our first  Merit Award Essay Contest. We invite Native American incoming college freshman and undergraduate students whose tribe is a member of TEDNA to submit an essay by August 24, 2015.  This year’s theme is “The Importance of Culture in Education”. Three awards will be given in the amount of: $500, $300 and $200, respectively.

The requirements are here. For more information, view our flyer here.

To become a member of TEDNA, click here.

If you have any questions, call (303) 447-8760 or email zephier@narf.org

Guest Post from Ansley Sherman: Colorado In-State Tuition Bill Dies

On Monday, May 4, 2015, the Colorado Senate Committee on State, Veterans, and Military Affairs voted to postpone HB 15-1027 indefinitely, effectively killing the bill.  As we have previously mentioned, this bill would have required state-supported institutions of higher education to classify Native American students with historical ties to Colorado as in-state students for tuition purposes.

HB 15-1027 was introduced in the Colorado House on January 7 and assigned to the House Education Committee.  The bill was later referred to House Appropriations and passed with amendments on its second reading.

The bill’s first amendment outlines that students classified as in-state students are eligible for state-funded financial aid but ineligible for a college opportunity fund stipend.  Another amendment inserted a new section that adjusts anticipated funding received by the department of higher education from the students’ share of tuition.  The final amendment slightly changed the name of the bill so that it read “A Bill for an Act Concerning In-State Tuition for American Indians from Tribes with Historical Ties to Colorado, and, in Connection Therewith, Reducing an Appropriation.”

HB 15-1027 passed the Colorado House as amended, and was introduced in the Senate on April 27.  You can see TEDNA and NARF’s testimony on this bill here.

Ansley Sherman is a legal fellow at the Native American Rights Fund.  She assists staff attorney Matthew Campbell with education matters, including HB 15-1027.