The New York Times highlighted a study that was recently done on the language gap between children that come from wealthy families and those that come from families with lower income.  The article is here. A quote:

President Obama has called for the federal government to match state money to provide preschool for all 4-year-olds from low- and moderate-income families, a proposal in the budget that Congress voted to postpone negotiating until later this year. The administration is also offering state grants through its Race to the Top Program to support early childhood education. Critics argue, however, that with so few programs offering high-quality instruction, expanding the system will prove a waste of money and that the limited funds should be reserved for elementary and secondary education.

Here is ICT’s second article on curbing racism in South Dakota schools.  An excerpt:

In the Rapid City Public Schools, cultural programs and encouraging racial acceptance has been a priority of the school superintendent, Tim Mitchell. However, the school’s alarming rate of arresting students is being questioned by the American Civil Liberties Union.

The first part in this series can be seen here.

Some seem to think so.  Section 116 of that Act, 20 U.S.C. Section 2326, is the Native American Career and Technical Education Program (“NACTEP”).  NACTEP provides grants to federally recognized Indian tribes, tribal organizations, Alaska Native entities and eligible BIE-funded schools to improve career and technical education (“CTE”) programs that are consistent with the purposes of the Perkins Act and that benefit Native Americans and Alaskan Natives. For more information on this program, go here, or here.

Section 117, 20 U.S.C. Section 2327, is the Tribally Controlled Postsecondary Career and Technical Institutions Program.  This program awards grants to eligible tribally controlled postsecondary CTE institutions to provide basic support for the education and training of Indian students in CTE programs and for institutional support of tribally controlled postsecondary career and technical institutions. More information on this program can be seen here.