Know Before “U” Go is a college preparation program designed by the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC). The program teaches about post-secondary education, financial aid, and scholarships for the upcoming fall of 2016. They will have two locations set up. The first location is in Seattle, Washington in October and the second location in Rapid City, South Dakota in December. Click the link below to find out more details.

http://www.aigcs.org/

Date: 04/06/2016 02:15 PM
Location: Dirksen628
Type:Legislative Hearing

  •  S. 2304, a bill to provide for tribal demonstration projects for the integration of early childhood development, education, including Native language and culture, and related services, for evaluation of those demonstration projects, and for other purposes;
  •  S. 2468, a bill to require the Secretary of the Interior to carry out a 5-year demonstration program to provide grants to eligible Indian tribes for the construction of tribal schools, and for other purposes;
  • S. 2580, a bill to establish the Indian Education Agency to streamline the administration of Indian education, and for other purposes;
  • S. 2711, a bill to expand opportunity for Native American Children through additional options in education, and for other purposes.

The Department of Education has prepared a revision to its policy for your consideration and comment. Tribal consultation on this draft will take place at the following dates and locations:

  • April 22, 2015 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
  • April 26, 2015 Tribal Self-Governance Conference, Reno, NV
  • June 28, 2015 NCAI Mid-Year Meeting, St. Paul, MN

We encourage your written comments. Please submit them to this website from now until July 13, 2015. SEND COMMENTS TO: Tribalconsultation@ed.gov.

More can be seen here.

An excerpt: FORT YATES, NORTH DAKOTA—One evening a week, young and old gather in Michael Moore’s classroom in Fort Yates, North Dakota, to learn Lakota — the language of their Sioux tribal ancestors.

For many of the students here at Sitting Bull College, it’s a tongue their great grandparents spoke fluently at home.

But that changed in the early 1900’s, when thousands of Native American children were sent to boarding schools where they were told to assimilate, learn English and forget all aspects of their native culture.

Gabe Black Moon, who co-teaches Lakota with Moore, remembered his time at one such school.

“The government punished [us for speaking] our language, and I’ve seen that happen. It happened to me,” he said. “Day one, I went to school, I couldn’t speak English. I got punished pretty bad.”

Presidential recognition

Renewed efforts to preserve Lakota for future generations received national recognition earlier this year when President Barack Obama visited Standing Rock Native American Reservation, where he praised Sioux tribal leaders’ for revitalizing the endangered tongue.

To read the full article, click here.

The Department of Education (ED) invites stakeholders to provide comments on proposed priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the Indian Demonstration and Indian Professional Development programs. Last week, ED published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for the Professional Development program and the Demonstration Grants for Indian Children (Demonstration Grants program). Both grant programs are authorized under Title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA). For the Professional Development program, the regulations would enhance the project design and quality of services to better meet the objectives of the program; establish post-award requirements; and govern the payback process for grants in existence of the date these regulations become effective. For the Demonstration Grants program, ED is proposing new priorities, including one for the newly-announced Native Youth Community Projects, and application requirements.

Submission Information:
• Federal Register Notice
• Submission Deadline: January 2, 2015
• Electronic Submissions: Please visit http://www.regulations.gov
Or Mail to:

John Cheek
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue SW
Room 3W207
Washington, D.C. 20202-6135
(202) 401-0274

For more information, please contact John Cheek at the U.S. Department of Education at (202) 401-0274 or john.cheek@ed.gov.

The Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education proposes priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the State Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) program. The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2015 and later years. We propose this action to enable tribal educational agencies (TEAs) to administer formula grant programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), and to improve the partnership between TEAs and the State educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs) that educate students from the affected tribe.

Comments are due by December 1, 2014

Follow the link here for further information or contact Shahla Ortega, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., room 3E211, Washington, DC 20202-6450. Telephone: (202) 453-5602 or by email: shahla.ortega@ed.gov.