Today’s throwback is about a discrimination lawsuit against a South Dakota School District that was settled in 2007.  The case was Antoine v. Winner School District, which the ACLU and Rosebud Sioux Tribe prosecuted.  A snippet from the ACLU website:

In March of 2006, the ACLU’s Racial Justice Program, ACLU of the Dakotas and Attorney General of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe filed a complaint in federal district court on behalf of Native American families with children in South Dakota’s majority-white Winner School District. The class action lawsuit claimed that the schools discriminated against Native American students in disciplining them, were hostile toward Native American families, and took statements from students involved in disciplinary matters that were later used to prosecute them in juvenile and criminal courts.

The complaint, which was filed in federal district court, can be seen here. The complaint to the Office of Civil Rights within the Department of Education can be seen here.  Details on the Settlement can be seen here. Unfortunately, it seems as if this type of conduct from School Districts is far from uncommon. See, e.g., here and here.

The article is here from Native News Online.  An excerpt:

On Wednesday, December 11, as part of the Obama Administration’s commitment to strengthen education for Native youth, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn will visit New Mexico to tour a Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) tribally controlled grant school located on the Pueblo of Laguna reservation.

The visit to the Laguna Elementary School and a subsequent roundtable with principals from other local tribally controlled grant schools and BIE-operated schools will help inform the work of Interior’s American Indian Education Study Group.

Here is an in depth series on Native Education. An excerpt:

On most measures of educational success, Native American students trail every other racial and ethnic subgroup of students. To explore the reasons why, Education Week sent a writer, a photographer, and a videographer to American Indian reservations in South Dakota and California earlier this fall. Their work is featured in this special package of articles, photographs, and multimedia. Commentary essays offer additional perspectives.

There are stories from South Dakota, California, and on the sequestration effects on Native education, among others.

Here. An excerpt:

Curious about New Mexico’s tribes? Now there’s an app to help you learn more about the state’s diverse American Indian culture.

The free iPad application, created by the New Mexico State University, offers interesting facts in a fun format about the state’s 22 pueblos, tribes and nations. The goal is to educate residents about the culture, said Justin McHorse, a director with the university’s American Indian program. He said the idea came from a board game created three years ago that has been used as an educational tool in the classrooms.

And here is an opinion piece on the app, with an excerpt.

Modern kids like using technology to learn — whether driving with family or sitting in the classroom. Providing knowledge about the state’s original inhabitants through the latest technology makes sense, and perhaps use of the app will spread across the country.

One of the best ways to combat ignorance about the continent’s first inhabitants is by the spread of knowledge. Eventually, with knowledge, residents in states with fewer Native communities can begin to understand that Indians are living cultures, not just a relic of history.

Here. An excerpt.

At 45.5 percent, Minnesota has the lowest on-time high-school graduation rate for its Native American students of any state in the country. Though acknowledging that hard truth, a new report by the Minnesota Campaign for Achievement Now (MinnCAN) reflects hope.

The report, “Native American Student Achievement in Minnesota,” not only focuses on some of the programs that are working for Indian students, but it is also a clear statement of Indian people’s commitment to help their children.

Said Gerard Sorderlet Sr., chairman of the Cloquet Local Indian Education Committee and an enrolled member of the Fond du Lac Tribe: “On the reservation we have a lot of addiction and a lot of poverty, and the only thing I know that can change that cycle is education.’’

The Report can be seen here.