An excerpt: FORT YATES, NORTH DAKOTA—One evening a week, young and old gather in Michael Moore’s classroom in Fort Yates, North Dakota, to learn Lakota — the language of their Sioux tribal ancestors.

For many of the students here at Sitting Bull College, it’s a tongue their great grandparents spoke fluently at home.

But that changed in the early 1900’s, when thousands of Native American children were sent to boarding schools where they were told to assimilate, learn English and forget all aspects of their native culture.

Gabe Black Moon, who co-teaches Lakota with Moore, remembered his time at one such school.

“The government punished [us for speaking] our language, and I’ve seen that happen. It happened to me,” he said. “Day one, I went to school, I couldn’t speak English. I got punished pretty bad.”

Presidential recognition

Renewed efforts to preserve Lakota for future generations received national recognition earlier this year when President Barack Obama visited Standing Rock Native American Reservation, where he praised Sioux tribal leaders’ for revitalizing the endangered tongue.

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Date: 11/19/2014 02:30 PM
Location: 628 Senate Dirksen Bldg
Type: Oversight Hearing

Witnesses:

THE HONORABLE ROBERT L. LISTENBEE JR.
DR. YVETTE ROUBIDEAUX,
Acting Director-Indian Health Service
MS. KANA ENOMOTO,
Principal Deputy Administrator-Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Panel 1

MR. RICK VAN DEN POL
Director and Principal Investigator-Institute of Educational Research and Service, The University of Montana National Native Children’s Trauma Center

MS. VERNÉ BOERNER
President/CEO-Alaska Native Health Board

To visit the website for more information, click here.

The Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education proposes priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for the State Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) program. The Assistant Secretary may use one or more of these priorities, requirements, definitions, and selection criteria for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2015 and later years. We propose this action to enable tribal educational agencies (TEAs) to administer formula grant programs under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), and to improve the partnership between TEAs and the State educational agencies (SEAs) and local educational agencies (LEAs) that educate students from the affected tribe.

Comments are due by December 1, 2014

Follow the link here for further information or contact Shahla Ortega, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., room 3E211, Washington, DC 20202-6450. Telephone: (202) 453-5602 or by email: shahla.ortega@ed.gov.

Here. As the excerpt below shows, there is still a lot of uncertainty until the details are hammered out.

It is a macro-level deal that makes recommendations on topline discretionary spending levels for fiscal years 2014 and 2015, so the details of how Indian program funding will be affected have yet to be ironed out and released by congressional appropriators.

Indian country officials are currently widely reminding appropriators of the budget cuts tribes have faced as a result of sequestration, and tribes are encouraging a restoration of and increase in federal support.

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/12/19/will-indian-country-funding-increase-under-budget-deal-152791

We have also heard that the Interior and Education budgets are typically hotly contested, and thus we could end up with a continuing resolution for these agency budgets, essentially continuing last year’s budget for FY ’14.

The articles are here and here.

PIERRE — A new report from the South Dakota Board of Regents recommends ways to help American Indian students succeed in state universities.

A working group recommends that campuses reach out to Native American high school students to help them enroll in college. It also recommends providing more scholarships and grants to American Indian students and developing academic programs and student services that better reflect the family-centered orientation of tribal life.

A study done by Regents researcher Daniel Palmer found that American Indian students are affected by financial challenges, lack of mentors and fears about leaving home and family. Students involved in the study also said they were encouraged to pursue an education by family support and a desire to help their tribes.

The universities want to recruit more American Indian students.

The Board of Regents announcement is here.  If we get our hands on the report, we will put it up.

The report can be found here.

Here.  An excerpt:

Learning about Native history and culture doesn’t need to be relegated to one month of the year. Though the Indian Land Tenure Foundation (ILTF) thought Native American Heritage Month would be a good time to release its Native American land curriculum website for pre-K and K-12 classrooms.

“The launch of this website in November coincides with National Native American Heritage Month and the approach of Thanksgiving—for many public school teachers, the only time during the school year they will discuss Native American history in their classroom,” said ILTF President Cris Stainbrook in a November 18 press release. “We would invite all of them to look through the curriculum and choose at least one grade-appropriate lesson to replace the old worn out story of the Pilgrims, and perhaps think about adding one other lesson the week after Thanksgiving.”

The Lessons of Our Land website and curriculum can be found here.

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/12/02/lessons-our-land-curriculum-launched-during-heritage-month-152522