The American Indian/Alaska Native Employees Association (AIANEA) is offering two scholarships to AI/AN students pursuing a degree in the natural resources field. The scholarship amount varies between $150 and $500. Recipients will also receive a one-year AIANEA Student Membership.

Eligibility

• Applicant must be attending (or planning to attend) an accredited college or university
• Must be enrolled (or planning to be enrolled) in a course directly related to a natural resources field
• Must maintain a GPA of 2.5 or higher

Application Materials

• Access the scholarship application form here.
• Enclose a copy of the most recent grade transcript or, if this is your first semester, include a letter from each instructor stating present grade average in the course.
• A photo and short biography, including your plans for the future.

Application Deadline: October 26, 2014

Visit http://www.cnay.org for a comprehensive list of available resources (scholarships, fellowships, summer programs, grant opportunities, etc.).

Webinar Series – BIE Blueprint for Reform: Understanding the Implementation, Part II

 Due to consistent demand from our membership for more information, NIEA will hold our second Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) informational webinar tomorrow on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 at 4:00 pm (eastern). For those who missed the initial session, we are providing this opportunity for additional dialogue and new information so our stakeholders can decide the best pathways for local schools and communities. Registration is open NOW, so if you are an educator, parent, tribal leader, or stakeholder who is curious for what this reform means for your student, school, or community, this is the perfect opportunity to get more information.

 Facilitators

  • Dr. Charles “Monty” Roessel, BIE Director
  • Ahniwake Rose, NIEA Executive Director

Important Information

  • Date: TODAY – Tuesday, September 16, 2014
  • Time: 4:00 pm (eastern)
  • Registration: Please click HERE.
  • Additional Details: Please visit www.niea.org.

Material for the Event 

For more information or questions, please contact Clint J. Bowers, NIEA Policy Associate, at cbowers@niea.org.

Due to consistent demand from our membership for more information, NIEA will hold a second Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) informational webinar on Tuesday, September 16, 2014 at 4:00 pm (eastern). For those who missed the initial session, we are providing this opportunity for additional dialogue and new information so our stakeholders can decide the best pathways for local schools and communities. Registration is open TODAY, so if you are an educator, parent, tribal leader, or stakeholder who is curious for what this reform means for your student, school, or community, this is the perfect opportunity to get more information.

Facilitators
• Dr. Charles “Monty” Roessel, BIE Director
• Ahniwake Rose, NIEA Executive Director
Important Information
• Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 (Date change)
• Time:  4:00 pm (eastern)
• Additional Details: Please visit http://www.niea.org

Background
Tribal leaders and Native education stakeholders have long requested that the federal government uphold its trust responsibility to Indian education. While there has been some cause for concern regarding the bureaucratic reform, the President’s summer announcement on Indian education increased momentum for ensuring tribal authority in education. The proposal to redesign the BIE under the June 12, 2014 Secretarial Order is based on recommendations from the Indian Education Study Group (Study Group), which DOI Secretary Jewell and Secretary of Education Duncan convened to diagnose the systemic issues within BIE schools.

Material for the Event
• White House Fact Sheet
• June 12, 2014 DOI Secretarial Order
• BIE Transformation Blueprint
• Indian Education Study Group Information
• NIEA/NCAI Joint Comments
• NIEA Senate Testimony on the BIE
For more information or questions, please contact Clint J. Bowers, NIEA Policy Associate, at cbowers@niea.org

Kānehūnāmoku Voyaging Academy’s new project, Hālau Holomoana is accepting applications. The purpose of this project is to pilot a Hawaiian culture/waʻa based maritime vocational training program for high school juniors and seniors. Based on our learning from grand master navigator Mau Piailug and the ʻohana of waʻa, we hope this program will inspire young Hawaiians to enter the maritime industry, to provide them with the skills necessary to enter confidently into 2 and 4 year academies, as well as expose them to the local opportunities in Hawaii’s maritime industry.

Hālau Holomoana is a year long program that begins each fall, consisting of 180 hours of total instruction, culminating in a 10 day open ocean voyage (click here for images of the voyage). Hālau Holomoana having garnered planning input and commitments of support from retired kūpuna who fulfilled successful maritime careers as well as skilled seamanship professionals, cultural practitioners and master navigators, reflects a promising inter-generational, community-based approach. Most importantly, Hālau Holomoana prepares youth for careers that provide a comfortable livelihood while also affording ample time away from work to give back to the community through lifelong learning and perpetuation of Hawaiian canoe culture.

Training will include FA/CPR, water safety, boating and seamanship skills, small boat handling, training on Kānehūnāmoku, coastal and non-instrumental navigation, Hawaiian culture and protocol, with field trips to maritime industry related sites like METC, Hōkūleʻa, Matson Navigation, and Hawaii Tug and Barge.

To learn more about the program or to apply, click here.

 

A Native American child was reportedly sent home early from his first day of Kindergarten last week because officials said his long hair conflicted with the school’s dress code.

Malachi Wilson, 5, does not receive haircuts because it is against his religion as a member of the Navajo Nation, the child’s mother told a local CBS affiliate. Apparently though, this religious rule conflicts with F.J. Young Elementary School’s dress code, which says that, “Boys’ hair shall be cut neatly and often enough to ensure good grooming.”

When the child showed up for his first day of Kindergarten at the Texas school he was sent away. The principal told April Wilson, Malachi’s mother, that he would not be able to attend class until his hair was cut, reports Native News Online.

To view the entire article and video, click here.

Federal officials got a firsthand look at one deteriorating Native American school in Minnesota Tuesday–they said it’s one of many suffering similarly throughout the country.

After touring Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School in Bena, Minnesota, Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell said it’s just one example of how the country is letting down it’s Native American students.

Employees said at this school about 30 miles west of Grand Rapids, they don’t have many of the daily classroom materials they need. Jewell said the science rooms particularly suffer. Used previously as a bus garage, part of the school is made with metal, and as employees said, that doesn’t lend well to the extreme cold weather the area often faces.

“It needs a lot of work and there are a lot of issues mainly when the whether gets very cold,” Benjamin Bowstring, an employee with the school, said. He said bats often find their home in the school as well.

The school is Bureau of Indian Education funded and also receives some dollars from the Leech Lake Ojibwe tribe, but Jewell said that hasn’t been enough.

There are 183 Native American schools funded through the BIE across the country and more than 60 of those are operating under poor condition. Jewell estimated today it could cost more than $25 million to completely restore the Bug-O-Nay-Ge-Shig School and Wasburn guessed it could cost nearly $1 billion more to fix all the others.

“It is important that we make progress, and you’ve got to start in the areas that have the biggest safety issues, where you’ve got supportive people from the tribal standpoint, from a school administration standpoint and this is a great example,” Jewell said.

She said the next step is asking Congress and administration for their support.

“It’s awareness, it’s priority and frankly as a country, you can’t save your way to prosperity,” Jewell said. “You can’t save your way to having well-educated Indian children.”

 

To view the entire article and video, click here.