ANNOUNCEMENT: 2016 Professional Development Program Application Now Open!

The Office of Indian Education Professional Development Program competition opened on May 17, 2016 and closes on July 1, 2016. The purposes of the Indian Education Professional Development Grants program are to:

  1. increase the number of qualified Indian individuals in professions that serve Indians;
  2. provide training to qualified Indian individuals to become teachers, administrators, teacher aides, social workers, and ancillary educational personnel; and
  3. improve the skills of qualified Indian individuals who serve in the education field.

The notice was published in the Federal Register at this link: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-05-17/pdf/2016-11606.pdf.

Interested applicants will need to use the grants.gov website to apply at http://www.grants.gov. The Grants.Gov Opportunity Number is: ED-GRANTS-051716-001.

For more information you may click here: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/indianprofdev/applicant.html.

OIE ANNOUNCES 2016 NATIVE YOUTH COMMUNITY PROJECTS COMPETITION

The Office of Indian Education announces on Monday, February 29, 2016 the availability of the 2016 Native Youth Community Projects applicaton. The announcement published today, February 29, 2016 and will close May 31, 2016. The 2016 competition is the second year under the Native Youth Community Projects priority under the demonstration program. In 2015 twelve applications were funded for a period up to four years. For 2016, however, there will be additional funding for additional projects to be funded, expanding even further, the college and career ready capability of local tribal communities.

The Notice Inviting Application was published in the Federal Register on February 29, 2016 and is available at this link: https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-02-29/pdf/2016-04260.pdf.

For more information you may check the Demonstration Grant program page here: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/indiandemo/applicant.html.

A new press releases was issued on Monday, Feb 29 regarding the Native Youth Community Projects competition for 2016. You may find the press release at this link: http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/historic-investment-174-million-grants-available-help-native-youth
. (February 29, 2016)

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004 BIE Part B 2016 Grant Award Application

Under the General Education Provisions Act and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) is required to publish their annual Part B Grant Award application for 60 days, of which 30 days must be allowed to accept public
comment. The application for Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2016 includes the required assurances and certifications for the BIE to be eligible to receive the FFY 2016 Part B funds.

The application includes assurances and provisions which the state can and/or cannot make as mandated by Part B oflDEA in order to provide the appropriate services to Indian children with disabilities who are enrolled in Bureau funded schools, including Tribal Contract and Grant schools. Also included are the certifications and other information pertinent to the application. The BIE Part B Grant Award application is posted beginning March 2, 2016, and ending May 2, 2016. The public comment period starts April 2, 2016 and ends May 1, 2016.

For more information, click here.

US. Department of Education Awards More Than $325,000 to Help School District on Pine Ridge Reservation Recover From Multiple Student Suicides

An excerpt:

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Safe and Healthy Students awarded Little Wound School on the Pine Ridge Reservation in southwestern South Dakota a Project School Emergency Response to Violence (SERV) grant totaling more than $325,000. The grant will be used to assist the Little Wound School with ongoing recovery efforts following 12 suicide deaths on the Pine Ridge reservation, including the deaths of current and former Little Wound School students, and relatives and friends of the students. In addition, there have been more than 100 suicide attempts on the reservation during the 2014-15 school year. This is the third Project SERV grant awarded to a school district on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The first grant was awarded in June 2010, and in June 2015, the Department awarded a grant to Pine Ridge School following a significant increase in student suicides. 

“These incidents are troubling, and my heart goes out to the students, families and community of Pine Ridge,” U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said. “There are so many people involved in the work to help children, families and the community heal after these tragedies, and this grant will help this community receive the services it needs to move forward in restoring the learning environment.”

There are two types of Project SERV awards—Immediate Services and Extended Services. Immediate Services grants provide emergency, short-term assistance to affected school districts or colleges and universities. Extended Services grants assist school districts and colleges and universities in carrying out the long-term recovery efforts that may be needed following a significant, traumatic event. To date, the Office of Safe and Healthy Students has awarded more than $42.1 million to 128 grantees, including Little Wound School, since the grants program began in 2001.

To view a list of Project SERV grantees and award amounts, or to learn more about the program, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/dvppserv/index.html.

To read the entire press release, click here.

Dreamstarter Grant Year 2: Arts and Culture

Over 5 years,Running Strong will provide fifty $10,000 grants to American Indian youth to help make their dreams a reality. Working with a non-profit organization that will act as their mentor,each Dreamstarter will have the opportunity to create and manage community-Level projects based on their dream. Ten Dreamstarter projects will be chosen each year with particular focus on that year’s theme:

Year 1 2015: Wellness
Year 2 2016:Arts & Culture
Year 3 2017: Education
Year 4 2018: Science ft The Environment
Year 5 2019: Any of the above

Every Dreamstarter and her or his mentor organization will be sent to an all expenses paid, four-day training workshop hosted in Washington, DC by Running Strong. In addition to learning invaluable skills for making their dream become reality, grant recipients will have the opportunity to meet Olympic Gold Medalist and Running Strong
Spokesperson Billy Mil ls and other prominent Native American figures in Washington,D.C.

To apply for this grant, each eligible Dreamstarter must:
– Be under 30 years old
– Be an enrolled member of a current or terminated federal/ state Indian Nation
– Identify and apply with a qualifying 501(c)3 or 7871 non-profit serving one or
more American Indian/Alaska Native/Native Hawaiian community

For more information, click here.

NCAIED AMERICAN INDIAN BUSINESS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM – Deadline October 16

Here.  An excerpt:

SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA:

  • Must be majoring in a business related field
  • Must be a junior, senior or graduate student
  • Must be enrolled as a full-time student
  • Must be enrolled at an accredited post-secondary institution of higher education
  • If selected, candidate must be able to attend the NCAIED Scholarship Awards Luncheon

(Expenses including lodging, ground transportation and airfare within the U.S. will be provided by NCAIED)
*Important: If selected a candidate is unable to attend, award will be forfeited.

Tribes awarded money to help youth go to college, get career ready

Here, from Fox 25 in Oklahoma. An excerpt:

Some Native American students in our area are getting help to move on to college or careers after graduation. The White House announced winners of $5.3 million in federal grants Thursday.

Six tribes in Oklahoma will received some money in the program, including the Cheyenne Arapaho Tribe which will work with El Reno Public Schools to help their students.

“This is one of those areas that we can use all the help we can get. We want our kids to graduate from here with the goal in mind,” El Reno schools superintendent Craig McVay said.

Of the students in the district, 12 percent are Native American, most belonging to the Cheyenne Arapaho tribe, McVay said.

Through the grant, those students will have their progress tracked from the 6th through 9th grades to make sure they’re getting the resources they need to move up after graduation and develop their abilities to do it.

The district will continue to work with them after that to see them through to college, vocational schools or careers.

The grants are part of an initiative by President Obama called “Generation Indigenous,” a project to help American Indian youth.

“These grants are an unprecedented investment in our native youth, and a recognition that tribal communities are best positioned to drive solutions and lead change,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a statement.

Tribes in nine states were awarded money. In Oklahoma the Absentee Shawnee tribe, Otoe-Missouri Tribe and the Creek, Cherokee, and Osage nations were also awarded grant money.

$5.3 Million Awarded to Help American Indian Youth Become College-, Career-Ready

From the Dep’t of Education, here. An excerpt:

The U.S. Department of Education today announced the award of more than $5.3 million in grants to help Native American youth become college- and career-ready.

Under the new Native Youth Community Projects (NYCP) program, the Department is making grants to a dozen recipients in nine states that will impact more than thirty tribes and involve more than 48 schools. These awards are a demonstration of President Obama’s strong commitment to improving the lives of American Indian and Alaska Native children and a key element of his Generation Indigenous “Gen I” Initiative to help Native American youth.

“These grants are an unprecedented investment in Native youth, and a recognition that tribal communities are best positioned to drive solutions and lead change,” said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. “These grants are a down payment on President Obama’s commitment last summer at his historic trip to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota to create new opportunities for American Indian youth to cultivate the next generation of Native leaders.”

TEDNA was one of the grantees, and its abstract is below.

The purpose of the Tribal Education Department National Assembly (TEDNA) Native Youth Community Partners (NYCP) Project (hereafter referred to as the TEDNA NYCP Project) is to develop, test, and demonstrate effectiveness of College and Career Readiness services and supports to improve the educational opportunities and achievement of Indian students in middle and junior high school among four tribes: the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, the Absentee Shawnee Tribe, The Muscogee (Creek) Nation, and the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes. The TEDNA NYCP Project is expected to achieve the goal that all participating Grade 6-9 Indian students will improve College and Career Readiness as defined by a successful transition into high school with a GPA greater than 2.0. The project will develop a plan that addresses and supports College and Career Readiness that is locally informed. The TEDNA NYCP Project will use community-based strategies that improve high school success among Indian students by measuring behaviors and psychosocial attributes early in their academic experience that are often overlooked in standardized tests, but critical components of their academic success. Measureable objectives of the project are: (a) to increase the academic Achievement of participating Indian students in Grades 6-9 to be College and Career Ready; (b) to increase informed College and Career Planning with Indian students in Grades 6-9; and (c) to build a College and Career Readiness Culture so that everyone, especially educators, community, students, and families ALL believe that Indian students are capable of success in College and Career.

Grant: Sovereignty in Indian Education

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) announces the availability of enhancement funds to tribes and their tribal education agencies to promote tribal control and operation of BIE-funded schools on their reservations. This notice invites tribes with at least one BIE-funded school on their reservation/Indian land to submit grant proposals.

Table of Contents

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DATES:

Grant proposals must be received by September 21, 2015, at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. BIE will hold pre-grant proposal training sessions. See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for more information.

ADDRESSES:

Complete details on requirements for proposals and the evaluation and selection process can be found on the BIE Web site at this address: www.bie.edu. Submit grant applications to: Bureau of Indian Education, Attn: Wendy Greyeyes, 1849 C Street NW., MS-4655-MIB, Washington, DC 20240. Email submissions will be accepted at this address: wendy.greyeyes@bie.edu. Limit email submissions to attachments compatible with Microsoft Office Word 2007 or later and files with a .pdf file extension. Emailed submissions may not exceed 3MB total in size. Fax submissions are NOT acceptable.Show citation box

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Ms. Wendy Greyeyes, Bureau of Indian Education, Office of the Director, Washington, DC 20240, (202) 208-5810.

For more information from the Federal Register, click here.

Tribal Education Department Grant Program- Notice

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) announces the availability of grants to tribes and their tribal education departments (TEDs) for projects defined under 25 U.S.C. 2020. This notice invites tribes with BIE-funded schools on or near Indian lands to submit grant proposals.

Table of Contents

Tables

DATES:

Grant proposals must be received by September 21, 2015, at 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time. BIE will hold pre-grant proposal training sessions. See SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for more information.

ADDRESSES:

Complete details on requirements for proposals and the evaluation and selection process can be found on the BIE Web site at this address: www.bie.edu. Submit grant proposals to: Bureau of Indian Education, Attn: Wendy Greyeyes, 1849 C Street NW., MS-4657-MIB, Washington, DC 20240. Email submissions will be accepted at this address: wendy.greyeyes@bie.edu. Email submissions are limited to attachments compatible with Microsoft Office Word 2007 or later and/or files with a .pdf file extension. Emailed submissions must not exceed 3MB total in size. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this notice for directions on email submissions.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:

Ms. Wendy Greyeyes, Bureau of Indian Education, Office of the BIE Director, (202) 208-5810; wendy.greyeyes@bie.edu.

For more information from the Federal Register, click here.